Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

md-duran-1VqHRwxcCCw-unsplash (1)Each week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 54 Online Adjunct jobs from 22 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

11 Online Teaching Positions – Purdue University Global

7 Online Teaching Positions – Liberty University

5 Online Teaching Positions – Grand Canyon University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: American National University, Bryan University, Capella University, Central Texas College, Columbia University, ECPI University, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, ICOHS College, Limestone University, Mercer University, Missouri Southern State University, Murray State University, Nebraska Wesleyan University, Northcentral University, Rasmussen College, South University, Trident University International, University of Maryland Global Campus, and Western Governors University.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, July 11th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Online Teaching Resources.

jane-palash--EFSnOZBf-Q-unsplashThink back to when you were enrolled in college. How long were your courses in terms of weeks and hours spent in the classroom? Chances are, if your college education was traditional—which is to say, typical—you likely enrolled in semesters. If that was the case, your classes probably took about 15 weeks to complete, and you were probably enrolled in classes for the “Fall” and “Spring” semesters. And as far as hours, you probably got used to around three to four hours a week for one class, with each class being around, say, 50 minutes.

Do online courses work the same way? Not at all—or rather, not necessarily. An online college course can range anywhere from 5 to 15 weeks, depending on what schedule the college follows: semester, quarter, trimester, or accelerated terms. Even hours can vary, and more so since the class doesn’t necessarily meet at a certain time. There are a lot of factors, then, to consider when thinking about online course “length.”

Research has shown that course length has no bearing on a student’s academic performance. Whether five weeks or fifteen, a student can get the same learning. So it is that you may find a variety of course lengths as you apply for online teaching jobs.

How Many Hours in a College Course?

This may be a good place to start, since the hours a class may take in order to get college credit will be generally around the same amount of time. Whatever the duration of a class—whether it happens over a semester, quarter, or an accelerated term—the contact hours generally will be 45 or so for the duration of the course. In a typical week of a semester, which many of us did back in the day before online education took off, that means you spend roughly three hours a week in a given class. By that I mean, three hours sitting in a classroom with a professor!

The online course, though, is far from “typical,” at least in relation to the traditional campus semester. In fact, even the “semester” is no longer the only schedule for college courses. And for online courses, “hours” don’t always matter, especially if the class is asynchronous—meaning, the class doesn’t meet for several hours a week. It may not meet at all.

What will probably matter more is how often a student logs in to class. That could be 2 to 5 times a week, depending on the teacher’s expectation. The student might expect to devote anywhere from 10 to 20 hours a week of work. If there is an interactive aspect of the course, like a class meeting done over video, that could range dramatically from 5 minutes to an hour a week. Experts differ on what is effective, but they all agree that maintaining attention is important: making content that engages the student and keeps their attention is important to consider in terms of time.

In an online course, students will essentially establish their own schedule for getting work done, responding to message boards and doing their readings. It may be more beneficial to think instead in terms of how many weeks an online course could encompass. That way, we can get a sense of what our yearly schedule as online adjuncts might look like. Let’s look at the various term lengths colleges typically schedule.

The Semester

The most common course length—the most traditional, even the most ordinary—is the semester. “What classes are you taking this semester?” is probably the most frequently heard question among college students as they sit around over coffees talking about their plans—at least a few decades ago, anyway. Fall and Spring, with a holiday break in between, followed by summer break—that’s the tradition. Or, in some cases, fall and spring may be followed by a summer semester! the Semester: What could be more nostalgic?

jane-palash-8EDoiUmHA4M-unsplashWhen we say “semester,” particularly for fall and spring, we are generally talking about 15 weeks, though they can vary around that number as well. Summer semesters, if they are offered, can be 12 weeks instead. In a semester’s worth of time, a student can reasonably take 5 courses at a time, give or take a class. Maintaining 15 credits is the norm.

At least one of the benefits of a semester should be obvious: students have lots of time. An instructor, too, has plenty of time to create and deliver the content, and students have plenty of time to get their work done. Given the amount of time, a student can expect things like midterm tests within a couple months of the course beginning—in shorter terms, those midterms will come far quicker!

In traditional brick-and-mortar colleges that offer online programs, students will take online courses that follow the same schedule as regular in-person classrooms. The semester, given the amount of time it entails, happens at a relaxed pace. Textbooks frequently have chapters that fit comfortably into one-chapter-a-week. For you, the teacher, you will have more flexibility when it comes to drafting out your schedule in terms of learning objectives, content, assignments, and discussions.

The Trimester and the Quarter

Colleges aren’t the only schools to use the trimester; many high schools have found this an efficient unit of time. Many first-time freshman will show up in their college campuses used to the trimester schedule, which may be around 12 weeks long. Three trimesters fit comfortably into the school year.

One of the benefits of the trimester is that the student can take more courses in the year. Classes can stretch over Fall, Winter, and Spring trimesters—and there may still be the option for additional summer courses, too. That said, students can’t take the full load of classes you’d take in a semester—instead, three or four classes at a time will be the norm.

Really, the quarter is not too different from the trimester. A quarter can generally be around 10 weeks. Like the trimester, this allows students to take more of a variety of classes over the course of a year because the terms are shorter—though the number of classes they could take during the quarter will be restricted: like the trimester, being enrolled in three or four classes during a quarter is a normal load.

Beginning with these shortened terms, content will begin to get more compressed for student and teacher both. You as the instructor will need to squeeze the same material into a shorter time frame, and you’ll have to think about how much time to give students to complete assignments—especially papers.

Accelerated Terms

It may seem unbelievable, but you can do an incredible amount of teaching—and learning, if you’re on the student side—in a very short time. How short? Anywhere from 5 to 8 weeks. This accelerated term will certainly be more demanding of students, and in all honesty, it can pose more of a challenge for the teacher, as well. The main issue is being constrained; students may feel like they don’t have enough time to complete the work. You might feel a bit rushed, too.

saffu-E4kKGI4oGaU-unsplashColorado College, as an extreme example, has courses that last three-and-a-half weeks, meeting from 9 a.m. to noon every weekday for a total of 18 days. With that schedule, students take only one course at a time: this is a block schedule. Eight blocks are offered per year, and the break between blocks is only four-and-a-half days! This block schedule includes online courses.

Oregon’s Linfield University, which hosts online programs, operates on a 4-1-4 system: the fall and spring semesters are a traditional 15 weeks, and in January they offer a condensed 4-week semester where students can take up to 5 semester credits, which amounts to one academic course and one paracurricular course.

Many colleges offer accelerated courses because they know that adult students just want to get done. Older students may be trying to get certifications for their careers, and they frequently have to juggle classes with real-world obligations. But just because the class is short doesn’t mean it has to be run at a breakneck pace.

Are Any of the Term-Lengths Better?

The short answer is, No. A 2019 study found that course length has no significant effect on how students perform between a 13-week and a 6-week version of the same course. That said, what contributed to their success was the extent of interaction the students had with the instructor. Keep this in mind! The shorter the class, the more important it is to encourage interaction—and not just encourage it but expect it. Which brings us to the issue of actually making a class that fits these different terms.

There are a lot of things to consider when crafting a course of any length. The course objectives must be taken into account to see that all are met. Content has to be measured out to meet them, and you have to consider how much time the students themselves have. No one should be overloaded, neither you nor the students.

Of course, there are pros and cons to every length of term. You may sacrifice the flexibility of longer classes and terms for a faster graduation time aided by accelerated courses, for example. But any term length can be made to work and benefit students.

In fact, many online courses are designed to meet the needs of students that differ from traditional freshman. Many online students are adults, and they have work and family obligations that need to be maintained while taking a course. There are a lot of students, too, who are simply more comfortable with the online version of classes, and they may simply appreciate the flexibility of time that an online class offers.

Columbia College in Missouri offers an online bachelor’s degree in less than four years. Post University in Connecticut offers an online business degree in as little as only two years. Colleges like these are hiring for people like you to teach their classes. Where do you begin?

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

devn-i4mSOgSNt58-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

 

This week we posted 39 Online Adjunct jobs from 24 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

5 Online Teaching Positions – Liberty University

4 Online Teaching Positions – Profhire, Inc.

4 Online Teaching Positions – Palm Beach Atlantic University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: Cambridge College of Healthcare & Technology, CTU-Online, ECPI University, Grand Canyon University, Los Angeles Pacific University, Mary Baldwin University, Maryville University, Middle Tennessee State University, National American University, Northcentral University, Paul Quinn College, Purdue University Global, Rasmussen College, Saint Leo University, Southern New Hampshire University, Texas A&M International University, University of Arizona Global Campus, University of Phoenix, Western Governors University, William Carey University, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, July 11th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under AdjunctWorld Resources.

tim-gouw-bwki71ap-y8-unsplashWhen you’re applying for a job, cover letters just go with the territory—teaching positions, in particular. You may have written cover letters for college teaching positions, but have you written one for an online teaching job? There’s a difference.

Your task is to write a cover letter for an online teaching job that paints you as the ideal candidate. Because the letter will accompany your CV, you’ll have the chance to go deeper with the points of your resume, and most importantly, you can explain why you will be the best choice to teach online courses. To do so, you’ll have to be specific about your abilities to teach adults online.

You can begin with a cover letter template of your own creation, shaping it accordingly to different colleges. That is, you don’t have to write cover letters over and over! In this post, we’ll cover some basic information that will make this cover letter different from one that applies to a classroom teaching job, and instead showcases your skills in virtual teaching.

Cover Letters: The Purpose

No surprise that pretty much every college will ask you for a cover letter. After all, this is a job with some weighty responsibilities! In the course of one page, single-spaced, you’ll introduce yourself, taking the opportunity to go into more depth with what is on your curriculum vitae. So where to start?

Start with the job posting. What is it the college is asking for in terms of job description, experience, education, everything? The cover letter is your opportunity to address those points one by one. Consider this as you write: the cover letter is not about what you think are your shining capabilities, but rather what the college needs. Think how many cover letters and CV’s may cross the desk on the far side of this job posting—make yours rise to the top by offering what they want.

national-cancer-institute-NFvdKIhxYlU-unsplashFor example, here’s a posting from Rock Valley College in Illinois, an online adjunct position in History. Note what they want: for “the student to appreciate the traditions of various cultures, understand the role of change and continuity, and have interests encompassing humanities, social sciences, fine arts, and natural sciences.” This is a good place to begin to color your cover letter, showing how you actually do this as a teacher.

There are other finer points in Rock Valley’s general duties: “creating the class syllabus and planning class content,” along with assessing students. That’s more general, but still, they’ve made clear that, unlike other colleges, the instructor will be designing the syllabus and coursework—in other colleges, that material is provided by the department. Another point to touch on, even if briefly: yes, I have done this, and I am comfortable doing it—in fact, I’m good at it.

Write yourself a draft cover letter and polish it. You could—and probably should—look at many job postings—you’ll begin to notice some patterns in what the colleges are asking for. Shape your letter to that. When you’re satisfied with what you’ve written, keep in mind that you don’t need to completely write a brand new letter for each college you apply for. Instead, go over their job posting carefully, and incorporate specific points the particular college asks for. Oh, and don’t forget to change the name of the college at the header!

Key Points in Your Cover Letter

Considering the fact that you are applying for online teaching jobs, you’re going to absolutely need to specify some important details.

absolutvision-82TpEld0_e4-unsplashLet’s look at a basic job posting, this one for online adjunct faculty in business. Sierra Nevada College bullet points some responsibilities that we can expect. “Understanding of and ability to apply principles for effective online teaching and learning.” “Experience teaching online, preferably to adult learners.” “Online course development experience with QM is a plus.” Note the emphasis on online teaching and learning, adult students, and the Quality Matters platform for online learning—here is where you’ll address your audience.

Additionally, there are some qualifications the college expects strictly in terms of business experience. “Relevant industry experience” is listed here, as is “experience with internship placement and/or professional development centers,” and even “international business experience”! Answering to these points will demonstrate your prowess in the marketplace, which is exactly what the college wants and students need.

Now let’s put all this information together into coherence: This job posting means you would be teaching adults the concepts of business, and those adults are (most likely) either furthering their careers or starting a new one—and you are the professional who can teach them online, help them secure an internship, and offer professional life experience. In here lie the “key words” that an application for this position must specify.

Let’s look at the key words.

Start with “online distance education.” Do you have experience teaching online? If so, get that in your letter, and include an anecdote if it’s appropriate. Naturally, you can talk about other teaching experience, as well—but what if you don’t have online teaching experience? Then explain why you want to teach online, and how you’re prepared to do so. Do you have any professional development in online teaching? In the letter it goes!

Include your experience with adult learners. Most students in online programs are adults, and they have unique needs that you will be expected to appreciate. Describing how you will meet those needs is paramount. Whatever knowledge and training you have in adult learning theory—in andragogy, that is—you should let the college know that.

Bring in any occupational experience you have within the field you are applying to teach in. This is your professional, “real world” experience. In terms of teaching psychology, nursing, or social work, the experience of clinical work, running shifts in a hospital, or helping the public navigate paperwork to get benefits is invaluable. How will you use your experience to teach adult learners? You’ve learned a lot on the job no doubt; recall your own training, whether in college classes or on-the-job: what worked? What was relevant?

towfiqu-barbhuiya-B0q9AkKV6Mk-unsplashWhat experience do you have with learning management systems, or the “LMS” for short? All online programs are going to make use of some kind of LMS software, like Blackboard or Moodle or Google Classroom. If you’ve used one of these programs, make that evident—even if it’s not the specific one they’re using. Some colleges offer training in their particular LMS, and that’s great—but showing that you’re ready to go and will not need to start from scratch is a big leg-up. Figure out which LMS the school uses and, if you are unfamiliar with it, see if you can get some training. Rock Valley College specifies that the teacher will need to utilize EAGLE, their LMS. In another posting, the University of North Carolina at Pembroke specifies that they use Canvas.

In fact, any training you’ve had as an online educator—classes you’ve taken, conferences you’ve attended—should fit into your letter. This shows that you yourself are an “adult learner,” willing to commit yourself to doing an excellent job and keeping yourself abreast of the latest developments and research in online education and andragogy. Lifelong learning matters!

Finally, as I mentioned before, be sure to address the specific requirements a college asks for. Some, for example, ask for certain certifications—if you have them, or are in the process of getting them, be sure to include that information.

Make It Personal

This could be said for any cover letter, but I’ll say it anyway: it doesn’t hurt to show your enthusiasm. If applying for an online teaching job is exciting, say so. If teaching adults and helping them network professionally is fulfilling, let them know.

Bluegrass Community and Technical College, in their posting for online psychology adjuncts, makes a point that “BCTC provides excellence in learning and service with caring, experienced professors…and a focus on student success.” Further down, there’s another value that comes up in their description, and that is the point that their customized workforce training serves more than 500 businesses annually, and that the college maintains partnerships with the community it serves to “improve economic vitality and quality of life in the region.” If that’s a value you uphold, say so in your letter.

It goes without saying that one can search online for any number of cover letter templates. You are cautioned against this! There are some basic structures you can follow—and we offer them through our OnRamp course—but aside from that, the heart of your letter should really be, well, your heart! Passion is a defining characteristic of a teacher, and that passion should come through in your words. Don’t overdo it, of course, but make the case that your excitement will be passed along to students.

More Information:

We offer more insights into the online teaching job cover letter in two other blog articles:

Need Help with your Online Teaching Job Cover Letter?

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashDo you need individualized feedback on your cover letter? In our OnRamp course, we will do that—along with answering your questions about the job market, reviewing and editing your Statement of Teaching Philosophy and your CV, and even offering suggestions on interview questions. Look over the full course description and register easily online. You can also check out some of the kind things our graduates have said over on our OnRamp: Reviews and Testimonials page.

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

linkedin-sales-solutions-VKJt1EZHlWs-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 37 Online Adjunct jobs from 21 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

7 Online Teaching Positions – Purdue University Global

5 Online Teaching Positions – Western Governors University

3 Online Teaching Positions – Strayer University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: AIU Online, Bryan University, Bryant & Stratton College, Capella University, CSU Global, CTU-Online, Fletcher Technical Community College, Franklin University, Grand Canyon University, Johnson & Wales, MCPHS, National American University, Northcentral University, Southern New Hampshire University, UMass Global, Unity University, University of New England, and Wake Forest University.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, July 11th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

kaitlyn-baker-vZJdYl5JVXY-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 53 Online Adjunct jobs from 22 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

8 Online Teaching Positions – Unity College

7 Online Teaching Positions – AIU Online

5 Online Teaching Positions – ECPI University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: American College of Education, Bryant & Stratton College, Capella University, Chamberlain University College of Nursing, Concordia University Nebraska, Grand Canyon University, Hussian College, Inc., Life University, Maryland University of Integrative Health, MCPHS, Northcentral University, Palm Beach Atlantic University, Paul Quinn College, Southern New Hampshire University, Strayer University, Syracuse University, University of Arizona Global Campus, University of Phoenix, Western Governors University.

 

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, May 9th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under AdjunctWorld Resources.

kenny-eliason-Ak5c5VTch5E-unsplashWhen you are applying for a position to teach college courses, whether in class or online, you will frequently be asked to provide a “statement of teaching philosophy.” Not always, mind you, but enough so that you will want to have one at the ready. You may have one formulated already, but then again, you may not even know what a teaching philosophy really is to begin with! In any case, crafting a teaching philosophy for an online course will be different from one you would put together for a regular classroom teaching position.

To write a statement of teaching philosophy for an online teaching job, you’ll need to think about how you practice andragogy (which is different from pedagogy), how you engage and motivate students, and how you provide feedback to them. You’ll also have to think about how your availability as a teacher allows you to accomplish all this—and more.

So where should you begin? Begin with the job posting you’re looking at and go from there. What is this college asking of applicants? What is it they value? But don’t stop there—look at other colleges, other jobs postings, and you’ll begin to see the common threads that you can weave into a teaching philosophy.

Start with Who You are Teaching: Adults

If ever there was a magic word for the online adjunct professor, it is this: andragogy.

Andragogy refers to adult education (as opposed to pedagogy, which refers to teaching children). Most colleges that have online programs look to recruit adult learners, which is by far the biggest subset of students enrolling in online classes anyway. You already know by now that online college programs are ideal for adult learners, most of whom have jobs, families, mortgages, responsibilities. Accommodating the realities of the adult learner is paramount—and your teaching philosophy will demonstrate that you know this fact to your bones.

It is helpful to look at some of the foundational thinking around andragogy, especially the points formulated by the American adult educator Malcolm Knowles, who began developing his theory of adult education following World War II. After the second world war, American institutions were virtually flooded with returning soldiers—all eligible for the GI Bill. Colleges were so bursting at the seams they had to build more just to fit them all. They needed, too, to build a new method of teaching this very different student.

christina-wocintechchat-com-SJvDxw0azqw-unsplashTo start, what motivates an adult to learn? Knowles points out six factors, each of which you need to consider when you craft your teaching statement.

First, adults need to know the reason they’re being asked to learn something. Adults want to know the relevance of what is being taught, and how it is going to benefit them. Adult students ask, why is this important to me? How can I institute it in my day-to-day life?

Second, adults learn by experience—they want to do things for themselves, with their own hands and minds. Making mistakes on their own terms is a part of this experience. This is different from passively absorbing lectures or reading textbooks and writing papers in response, what we might imagine as an Ivy League seminar—adults want to take what they’re learning to task.

Third, adults want to feel responsibility for their learning, which means they want to be actively involved in planning their education, as well as how they are assessed and evaluated. You could think of this as a kind of self-directed learning. Adults want to take an active role in everything they do—why not learning?

Fourth, the things that an adult learns need to be practical to the student’s life. What they choose to learn, therefore, is expected to have an immediate impact on their lives: their jobs, their hobbies, their personal lives. And jobs, as we have seen, and careers in general, are going to be a big reason for adults taking classes at all: they will routinely ask, How will this move me forward?

Fifth, adult learning is oriented not around “content” but specifically around solving problems. That is, they’re not going to be interested in simply learning “stuff,” but rather specific things they can use to solve the various problems in their lives, their careers, and so on. The more the class gives them the opportunity to solve problems (what better way to practice?), the more motivated they will be.

Finally, the adult student is going to be far more responsive to internal motivations rather than external. The adult learner is probably taking courses because they want to, not because they are expected to. They are savvy enough to know they want to better their lives, and keen to do so. In an online course, keeping that motivation going could be a challenge for them—but you can help.

In short, education must be meaningful for the adult learner—but not in the same way as children. You could think of it like this: kids, even younger undergraduates, are still absorbing knowledge; adults have knowledge, and they what to use it. How do you plan to make this happen? This is the basis of your teaching philosophy.

How an Adult Learns

There are some principles to adult learning that, again, you should study and embody. How does an adult learn best? Demonstrate that you understand this in your teaching philosophy. Here’s the main points.

Adults learn because they want to learn. The adult student responds well to self-directed learning where they can learn new skills (that will help them in their careers, or in their lives in general) or get the knowledge they desire, and when this interest is coupled with self-directed learning, the adult student will be excited and therefore motivated.

kelly-sikkema-gcHFXsdcmJE-unsplashThe adult will insist, then, that what they are learning must be relevant. The adult student is likely to have practical goals, and they will want to know how the knowledge you are teaching them can be applied to their lives and connected to their goals. This is a crucial point: how do you make content relevant to students? Especially self-directed adults?

The adult will learn best by “hands-on” learning; that is, they learn by doing, by practicing, and by participating, and the classwork allows them to experiment with methods. By doing so, they integrate what they are learning in your class into their experience as a parent, a worker, a manager. What kinds of activities have you done in a classroom to encourage hands-on, participatory learning?

The adult learns not by learning things in a certain order but by working to solve a problem. Adults work toward solutions, which is practicality in action that makes knowledge concrete. What kind of questions do you pose in the classroom? What problems do you pose for students to examine?

Adults, unlike children, have experience—and lots of it. How can you use their unique experience in the classroom? How can you incorporate their experience into classroom discussions? Think, too, that experience is a real boon, but it can also be a liability; after all, some of your adult students may not know things you take for granted. Some may have been out of school for a long, long time.

The adult learns best in an informal environment—and you are the designer of that environment. Although there will be a curriculum, you should think of curriculum being in terms of “student-centered” rather than “teacher-centered.” How have you fostered collaboration among students? How have you made the class inviting to students that are often diverse? Where have you encouraged networking among students and people in their experience outside the class?

Speaking of collaboration, the adult student wants to collaborate in their own learning process. Rote learning isn’t enough for them. Socialization is critical to adults, who want to be an active participant in the culture of the class, collaborating with other students and the instructor. To say it simply, they don’t want to be told what to do. They do want a say.

Adults are not kids. They are fully developed human beings who expect agency in their lives, including their education. How do you make education meaningful for adults? This is the core of your teaching philosophy, specifically as it relates to “adult learning.”

Those are the basics in andragogy. Now let’s look at how that applies in an online environment.

Teaching Philosophy: Some Other Fundamentals

So you’ve got a good sense of how andragogy works for you. Great—now let’s look at some other important points to bring up in your teaching philosophy, some of which are specific to teaching online.

Probably the most salient point to dig into here is how you use technology in the classroom. An online class is more than just PowerPoint presentations and Zoom calls. How do you use these technologies to maximum effect so that your adult students are motivated, collaborating, and getting practical experience? The more specific you can be here—by providing examples—the better.

The other major technology that you need to talk about is the learning management system, the LMS. Whether it’s Blackboard or Moodle, you’ll want to fully express your comfort level with LMSs you’ve used, and also how you use them to facilitate learning. A major point is the asynchronous discussion board—how does the discussion board contribute to adult learning?

brett-jordan-Ip23g8L05rs-unsplashYour statement of teaching philosophy should also detail your presence in class. If there is one thing students can’t stand, it’s a lack of participation and presence from the instructor! Yes, adult students are self-motivated, but they fully know it is the instructor’s job to facilitate the class, to provide for learning, for conversation, and to just be there to, you know, answer questions. That the online class makes this “presence” much more fluid—and it can certainly make it difficult—is a point to discuss. How have you created a collaborative, productive community from the raw material of your students? How responsive are you? How important to you is it to maintain presence in your class?

A final point for your statement of teaching philosophy is regarding the feedback you provide. Because adults prefer the “guide on the side” rather than teacher-directed learning, the majority of your teaching will be the feedback on student work and student responses. Remember, the adult learner wants practical, hands-on learning—but they also want feedback that is pointed and practical, as well. How do you provide this in an online environment?

You might also think of the shortcomings of technology and how you overcome them. One point to especially think on: the use of distance learning technology virtually (no pun intended) demands that students be self-motivated. How do you encourage this motivation in an atmosphere that is virtual?

Writing Your Statement of Teaching Philosophy

By now we all know that cover letters should probably stick to a page or, at best, two, and that it be formatted correctly, be addressed to an actual name rather than “To Whom It May Concern,” and other rules we’ve picked up along the way. In terms of a Statement of Teaching Philosophy, some of these factors will be useful—brevity, for one.

A statement of teaching philosophy should be just long enough to get the finer points across. Think 4-5 paragraphs. Think one page single-spaced. Now, some places will say that a teaching philosophy can be up to four pages long, but for you, who are not expected to be an academic in the traditional sense, err on the side of brevity. Most of all, think from the heart.

Iowa State University provides a good starting point. They offer some writing prompts to help jog your ideas and, basically, good starting points in the writing of this enormously important document. Here’s some of their important talking points.

What are your objectives and goals as a teacher? With adults, how will you foster lifelong learning? What is it you want students to learn? Then, how is it you actually achieve these goals? Explain your methods. Finally, how do you measure your effectiveness? That is, how do you know you have achieved your objectives? The goal here is to be reflective. Really think about what you are trying to accomplish as an educator and how you will do that.

Iowa State says that the one point you can be a bit grandiose in your statement is in answering the question, “Why do I teach?” Why does teaching matter…to you? Overall, your statement should be self-reflective (maybe even a bit poetic), but also specific. Think—I mean, really think—about the impact you have on students, if not the world as a whole. It’s OK to gush a little.

A good teaching philosophy should not be written from a template—believe me, HR professionals can spot those a mile away. Don’t do what everyone else is doing or you’ll end up, well, like everyone else—at the bottom of the pile. Make your statement personal, as affective as it is effective, and really let yourself shine.

Cornell University also offers a page with some good starting points. Think of the statement as a narrative that gets to three things: your conception of teaching (and learning, of course), a description of how you teach, and a justification for why you teach that way. Talk about your goals and then show how you accomplish them in the online class, with all its challenges.

Need a few examples? The University of Calgary offers nearly 30 teaching philosophies from award-winning teachers. But remember, even if Mark Twain said, “Good writers borrow, great writers steal,” make yours unique.

A teaching philosophy is about how effective you are as a teacher, with the evidence to prove it. But it is also about your beliefs and values, and these are inherently personal. Be an individual.

Teaching from the Real World

One thing to get across to hiring committees is that you yourself are an adult, and you have real world experience that informs the way you teach. You know how your own college education has been made practical, solving the problems of your own life, applying to your own career.

Your teaching philosophy has to demonstrate that you are intimate with the character of the adult learner, the non-traditional student, and the distance student. Show that you understand their needs and have created curriculum that emphasizes those needs. Show that you are committed to their success.

Online programs are not looking to hire research-based academics; they are looking for people with real-world experience. If you are looking to teach criminal justice or nursing, you can see how important that real-world experience will be to students who want to strike out in that direction. However, if you’re looking to teach online philosophy or history, you’ll have to show how your own life experience can make these subjects practical for the adult learner.

More than anything, show how you create a supportive atmosphere. The needs of adult learners are pronounced in today’s educational culture, and the colleges are looking to hire someone sensitive to that. This is a good place, too, to remind you that diversity is the norm in adult education.

Online Statement of Teaching Philosophy: How We Help

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashWhat you will probably need, especially at the start of your career, is some feedback yourself! At AdjunctWorld, we offer help specifically for your teaching philosophy as part of our OnRamp course.

In addition to support in applying for online jobs and giving feedback on your cover letters and CV, we professionally review and edit your Statement of Teaching Philosophy. Take a look at our course description and registration page.

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

linkedin-sales-solutions-UK1N66KUkMk-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 44 Online Adjunct jobs from 19 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

8 Online Teaching Positions – Longwood University (1 listing, 8 discipline areas)

7 Online Teaching Positions – Purdue University Global

5 Online Teaching Positions – Western Governors University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: Bellevue University, Capella University, CTU-Online, Dakota State University, Doane University, Eastern Oregon University, Grand Canyon University, Indiana Wesleyan University, MCPHS, Meridian University, Rasmussen College, TCSPP, University of Arizona Global Campus, University of Maine, West Coast University, and William & Mary.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, May 9th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

thought-catalog-505eectW54k-unsplash (1)Each week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 52 Online Adjunct jobs from 26 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

6 Online Teaching Positions – Texas A&M International University

5 Online Teaching Positions – Grand Canyon University

5 Online Teaching Positions – Western Governors University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: American National University, Bryant & Stratton College, Capella University, Collin College, Columbus College of Art and Design, CTU-Online, Eastern Oregon University, Eastern University, Franklin University, Galen College of Nursing, Georgia Military College, Liberty University, Our Lady of the Lake University, Peloton College, Remington College, Southern New Hampshire University, St. John Fisher College, Syracuse University, Trident University International, University of Maryland Global Campus, University of Phoenix, University of South Carolina, and Vincennes University.

 

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, May 9th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

mari-helin-ilSnKT1IMxE-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 51 Online Adjunct jobs from 20 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

15 Online Teaching Positions – Grand Canyon University

7 Online Teaching Positions – Liberty University

4 Online Teaching Positions – University of Maryland Global Campus

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: American Public University System, Bryant & Stratton College, Capella University, City Vision University, CSU Global, Florida Technical College, Galen College of Nursing, Indiana Wesleyan University, Laurel School of Culinary Arts, Northcentral University, Northeast Iowa Community College, Purdue University Global, Southern New Hampshire University, Strayer University, TCSPP, Westcliff College, and Western Governors University.

 

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, May 9th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!