Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

avel-chuklanov-DUmFLtMeAbQ-unsplash (1)Each week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 50 Online Adjunct jobs from 18 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

11 Online Teaching Positions – Rasmussen College

6 Online Teaching Positions – Southern New Hampshire University

5 Online Teaching Positions – Purdue University Global

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: American College of Education, Andrew College, Bay Path University, CTU-Online, Fielding Graduate University, Franklin University, Galen College of Nursing, Grand Canyon University, Laurel College of Technology, Louisiana Christian University, New Mexico State University at Grants, Pacific College of Health and Science, University of Arizona Global Campus, Western Governors University, and Yorkville University.

 

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, May 9th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

mars-IgUR1iX0mqM-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 41 Online Adjunct jobs from 21 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

7 Online Teaching Positions – Houston Baptist University

5 Online Teaching Positions – CTU-Online

5 Online Teaching Positions – Southern New Hampshire University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: American Public University System, Azusa Pacific University, Bay Path University, Bryan University, California Southern University, Cameron University, Capella University, Eastern Oregon University, Grand Canyon University, Linfield University, Northcentral University, Purdue University Global, South University, St. John Fisher College, Tallahassee Community College, University of Arizona Global Campus, University of Maryland Global Campus, and Walden University.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, May 9th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

kelly-sikkema-9OGNpJPVMZ8-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 41 Online Adjunct jobs from 20 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

4 Online Teaching Positions – AIU Online

4 Online Teaching Positions – University of Arizona Global Campus

4 Online Teaching Positions – Capella University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: Albany Law School, American Public University System, Aurora University, Bryant & Stratton College, Chamberlain College of Nursing, Concorde Career Colleges, CTU-Online, Grand Canyon University, Indiana Wesleyan University, Northwestern Health Sciences University, Purdue University Global, Regis College, Rize Education, Strayer University, Trident University International, University of Maryland Global Campus, and Western Governors University.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, May 9th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

freestocks-OfaDD5o8hpk-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 47 Online Adjunct jobs from 20 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

10 Online Teaching Positions – Syracuse University

5 Online Teaching Positions – Grand Canyon University

5 Online Teaching Positions – Purdue University Global

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: American College of Education, Bryan University, Cincinnati State, CTU-Online, Franklin University, George Fox University, Northcentral University, San Ignacio University, South University, Southern New Hampshire University, Strayer University, TCSPP, Texas A&M International University, Turion Corporation, University of Phoenix, University of San Diego, and Western Governors University.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, May 9th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

avel-chuklanov-DUmFLtMeAbQ-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 42 Online Adjunct jobs from 24 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

6 Online Teaching Positions –  Westminster College

4 Online Teaching Positions – Purdue University Global

3 Online Teaching Positions – Grand Canyon University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: Abilene Christian University, Alliant International University, Chamberlain College of Nursing, CTU-Online, Drexel University, Husson University, Jilin Normal University, Johnson & Wales University, MCPHS, Profhire, Inc., Regis College, Simmons University, Texas A&M International University, The College of St. Scholastica, Unity College, University of Arizona Global Campus, University of Maryland Global Campus, University of Phoenix, Wake Forest University, Wesleyan College, and Western Governors University.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, March 14, 2022. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

elissa-garcia-ckVjMurwKIs-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 41 Online Adjunct jobs from 19 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

7 Online Teaching Positions – Unity College

5 Online Teaching Positions – University of Maryland Global Campus

3 Online Teaching Positions – AIU Online

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: American Public University System, Ancora Education, Aurora University, California Baptist University, Drexel University, Grand Canyon University, Los Angeles Pacific University, Minneapolis College of Art and Design (MCAD), Northcentral UniversityPurdue University GlobalSouthern New Hampshire UniversitySyracuse University, University of Phoenix, University of the People, Wake Forest University, and Western Governors University

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, March 14, 2022. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

thought-catalog-Nv-vx3kUR2A-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 43 Online Adjunct jobs from 22 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

9 Online Teaching Positions – AIU Online

5 Online Teaching Positions – Capella University

4 Online Teaching Positions – Grand Canyon University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: Abilene Christian University, Bryant & Stratton College, Campbell University, CTU-Online, Georgia Military College, Northcentral University, Purdue University Global, Rize Education, Savannah College of Art & Design, Southern New Hampshire University, Southern Utah University, Strayer University, Texas A&M University, Touro University Worldwide, Unity College, University of California, Irvine, University of Maryland Global Campus, Western Governors University, and William & Mary.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, March 14, 2022. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Online Teaching Resources.

dom-fou-YRMWVcdyhmI-unsplash (1)Collaboration, Interaction, and sharing form the heart of an online course. Interaction leads to student engagement, and student engagement indicates success. If you’ve taught, or even attended, an online class of any sort, you know how strange it can seem. If you’ve even done a large-scale Zoom meeting—and who hasn’t, at this point?—you know that seeing a person on a screen is not quite the same as having them sitting right next to you. The difference we’ve all learned through the pandemic is that interaction is one of the most valuable currencies in the world. We need to be around other people.

An online environment, and especially large online classes, where students could number as many as several hundred, is prone to being impersonal. A student can fade easily into anonymity, and sometimes by choice. It is important, therefore, for you as an instructor to make an online class interactive, and there are a number of ways to do so. How you do so may  simply be a matter of how you encourage interaction not only between you and the student, but between the students themselves.

There has been a significant amount of research on streamlining online classes, including large sections, and professors have not given the idea of “interaction” short shrift at all. Interaction is essential. So how do you pull it off? Read on.

Be Available as the Teacher

First, let’s start with you. We know, from years of experience and pages of research, that interaction between the student and the teacher is critical. But you may be separated by geography and time zone, depending on where the college you’re teaching for is located (and depending on where the student is located, for that matter), so you have to make yourself fully present despite that handicap.

Begin with a discussion board. This is a place where you pose questions and prompts to students and then, most importantly, respond to them. Make sure that you respond to student input as much as possible. Now, in a small class, you can easily do this: you’re going to be evaluating their writing anyway, and it is easy to respond to them in as little as a sentence or two. Commend them on their research, or their opinion. Relate what they’ve written to other readings, or the responses of other students—the latter serves to stir more interaction, of course. Even if the student cannot see you, they know you are listening. Feedback matters.

jose-aljovin-JZMdGltAHMo-unsplashAnother way is through making yourself available for conferences. A “conference” can happen any number of ways. You can set aside certain times over the course of the week for, say, video conferences with an individual student—after all, they will have questions. But in a large class, where there may be many questions, and video conferencing them all will probably be too much. You can still make yourself available via email. Again, feedback is crucial—though later we’ll look at how students can provide that feedback to each other—and no matter how much responsibility you delegate to students themselves, they will appreciate and respect your participation. Be clear from the outset as to what your role will be. Establish the parameters of your availability—and stick with them.

Researcher Marcia Dixson (2010) published a paper on creating student engagement, and one of her salient points as to what makes online instruction effective is a strong instructor presence—but not too strong. She draws from other research, concluding that the teacher should be minimally active in online discussions (leave it to the students, but don’t be entirely absent) and to use email appropriately to keep in touch. Posting messages, responding to students, and participating in group activities are all important—the student will literally see you as a “real person.”

Have the Students Team Up

By now, many students in primary school have been taught how to work together. Group projects are the norm. For younger college students today, I’m going to hazard a guess and say they all know how to work together. But what about adult students?

Here’s one answer: if you’ve had a career, you’ve worked with other people. It’s really that simple. So in a large online class, form smaller groups. If you are teaching students who live in various places, be sure to group them according to what time zone they’re in, at the very least. But no matter how you do it, get the students to collaborate.

Dixson has much to say on this, too—and again, she draws on numerous research papers. Collaborative activities, group discussions, and peer interaction among students are necessary. “Active learning,” she points out, is a broad umbrella topic, which can encompass virtual teamwork, games, case studies, and more. These are different from lectures, readings, homework and tests—all the traditional coursework—which remain not only passive for the most part but individual.

marvin-meyer-SYTO3xs06fU-unsplashUsing nearly 200 students, Dixson investigated what students find engaging—little surprise that a good deal of them are interactive activities! First, she looks at student-to-student interaction. Peer review, as we’ve discussed before was rated by students as high engagement. Discussion forums between students were ranked the highest. In general, research and projects—both of which utilize student interest and self-mastery, of course—ranked highly.

In terms of interaction with the instructor, feedback on assignments was ranked highly—almost as much as connecting by email! The teacher’s participation in forums, too, was seen as important.

Dixson admits her results weren’t outright conclusive, as there wasn’t a large variation between student attitudes on passive and active learning, yet she also comments on some interesting results. “Given the research regarding the potential for social isolation of the online learner,” she says, “instructors should consider learning assignments that engage students with the content and with each other.” When it comes to communication with the teacher and other students, engagement is higher—thus, interactivity makes a class better. Teachers, she says, must create assignments where students interact not only with course content but each other—and require that students interact with each other.

“Students who are working on group projects together, doing peer review of one another’s papers, interacting with a discussion forum on a particular topic, are likely to feel more engaged in the course,” Dixson writes. “Clearly the path to student engagement, based on this data, is not about the type of activity/assignment but about multiple ways of creating meaningful communication between students and with their instructor—it’s all about connections.”

And connections are, naturally, grounded in interaction.

Encourage Interactive Discussions

Discussion boards are obviously an area where interaction happens—but only if approached correctly. You don’t want students to fall into passive responses and, worse, opinion-regurgitating. Professor Micah Pollack from Indiana University Northwest has a strategy.

Pollack, writing in the Journal of Teaching and Learning with Technology, describes his approach to online discussion that he created, A.V.I.D., which stands for (A)ctive, (V)aried, (I)nteresting and open-ende(D). Let’s summarize.

brooke-cagle--uHVRvDr7pg-unsplashActive questions have “real-world relevance and require students to investigate and define some tasks of the activity on their own…” As a business and economics teacher, Pollack has students pick a particular good—like coffee—and poll friends on what they would be most willing to pay for that good; next, students go to stores to find actual prices of the good. Their analysis arises from all this information—and it’s information that gets them away from the computer.

Varied questions allow for both active questions—like the one that gets you out polling friends and visiting stores—and more reflective questions. Now they can sit back and think about their results and draw conclusions from that. This helps the teacher attend to different learning styles (active movement vs. sitting-and-thinking) and gives students flexibility in their approach.

Interesting questions, Pollack writes, are ones that are “relevant, personal and even controversial for students.” Recent news, politics, and popular cultural happenings all make for relevance and interest. Discussions related to a student’s life—like their stance on gun control and student loan debt, for example—encourages enthusiasm in the student.

Finally, Open-Ended questions do not have a single answer, or a single firm conclusion. Here’s his example: Rather than ask “If the minimum wage is raised, what does the supply and demand model predict will happen?”—this will generate less discussion—ask instead “Do you personally think the minimum wage should be raised or not? Use the predictions of the supply and demand model to support your view.” The latter question generates many conclusions.

Now, what does the teacher do once they’ve asked this? They should moderate discussion rather than actively participate in it—and if you do respond, which you should at key points, be sure to do so in a way that encourages more discussion. Watch for errors in terminology and misunderstandings and correct them. If you can find alternative views to a student’s post, provide that—it will enable yet further discussion.

Use the Communication Tools

We’ve talked about discussions—about communicating, basically—but we haven’t yet talked about how one can do that—or, to put it bluntly, the actual technological tools to do that. Paige Cunningham (2017), in a publication by Johns Hopkins University Press, will help us get even more specific.

The online class, she points out, is not a one-way street. It’s no longer about teachers sending out material, lessons, and assignments, and then students simply returning their homework. Message boards, chat rooms, and wikis have made classes two-way streets—for the better.

Cunningham takes the constructivist approach to learning: the idea that learning happens communally, and that students learn by having conversations with themselves, their teachers, and their peers. This model, she notes, applies very well to distance education, the MOOC, the online class.

One of the best tools is the asynchronous collaborative tool, some of which include things like forums and various ways to message each other. Forums, for one, are essential—and this in the constructivist outlook—because “they serve as a venue for both academic and social discussions, thus helping students who are not physically together in a classroom to interact in a constructive manner.” Messaging functions, too, “can help provide online students with a method to talk privately about both coursework-related and non-coursework-related issues.”

There is a database-creation tool that “allows students to construct a group database that can be used to store research or files or track a project. All of these tools can be invaluable for helping online students find ways to work together and share knowledge remotely.” Additionally, she mentions chat rooms, wikis, audio/video conferencing, and virtual classrooms (VCs). Wikis, to describe just one of these features, “can be used for taking shared notes, managing a group project, brainstorming on ideas, and many other functions.” The fact that they are free, open-sourced, easy to learn, updatable, and able to be used asynchronously makes them valuable. Audio/video conference software, which makes an online course synchronous, provides instantaneous feedback—the interaction is live.

linkedin-sales-solutions-1LyBcHrH4J8-unsplashIt’s important to know, Cunningham makes clear, that you can use these tools badly: “their ineffective use can cause considerable damage, such as students possibly feeling dissociated from the course and institution, failing to connect with classmates, losing interest in participating in the course, or simply doing poorly in the course.” The answer to this begins with training—for you. You, as the instructor, have to maximize the full benefits of these tools by learning them to their core. Utilize the full range of their possibilities. Some colleges offer training in their LMSs (learning management systems), their CMSs (course management systems), or their VCs.

You can, of course, train yourself, as well. After all, students already know the basis of this stuff, though they probably aren’t familiar with a specific system.

Students, Cunningham reminds us, come into college expecting technology. They are used to multitasking, and they expect immediate responses to their questions, emails, and texts. Connection—through social media, texting, and all things smart phone—is a way of life. Not only do they not handwrite, relying on typing, but much of that typing is with their thumbs on their phone! CMS’s and LMS’s are perfect for them, the way they see it—they have instant access to grades and assignments (and if they missed class, all the better) and they can readily message other students and their teacher. Student engagement is fully there—at least in potential, and your own buy-in will enable theirs.

To pull it all together, remember one adage: interaction leads to engagement. Train yourself in the tools and use them to their full potential. Focus especially on anything that allows students to communicate with you and each other. Even a large class will benefit.

 

References

Cunningham, P. (2017). Bridging the distance: Using interactive communication tools to make online education more social. Library Trends, 64(4), 589-614. https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/bitstream/handle/2142/103584/Cunningham.pdf

Dixson, M. (2010). Creating effective student engagement in online courses: What do students find engaging? Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 10(2), 1 – 13. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ890707.pdf

Pollack, M. (2017). Designing and managing engaging discussions in online courses. Journal of Teaching and Learning with Technology, 6(1), 6-80. https://scholarworks.iu.edu/journals/index.php/jotlt/article/download/22367/29070/53041

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

scott-webb-O0T1SIgHAfM-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 38 Online Adjunct jobs from 27 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

3 Online Teaching Positions – University of New England

3 Online Teaching Positions – University of Phoenix (1 job posting, three discipline areas)

3 Online Teaching Positions – Grand Canyon University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: Abilene Christian University, Alfred State College of Technology, American Public University System, Campbell University, Capella University, Central Texas College, Columbia University, Concorde Career Colleges, CTU-Online, Fairleigh Dickinson University, Grand Canyon University, Herzing University, IBMC College, John Brown University, Los Angeles Pacific University, Northcentral University, South College, South University, Southern New Hampshire University, Unity College, University of Arizona Global Campus, University of Maryland Global Campus, University of North Texas, West Coast University, and Western Governors University.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, March 14, 2022. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

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national-cancer-institute-NFvdKIhxYlU-unsplashLet’s say you’re a registered nurse (an RN), and you’re interested in contributing to your profession in a new way. Or maybe you’re just looking for a side gig to bring in a few extra dollars. What can you do with your nursing skills, your knowledge, and your passion? You can teach nursing to college students as an online adjunct.

Wait, online? Really? Nursing?

As a matter of fact, online programs in nursing are thriving. Why? Growth, basically. Because of the fact that the health care industry is expanding, teaching jobs for college nursing programs are proliferating as well. Many college programs hire for online classes in nursing, and the job outlook for those teachers is good.

You might ask of nursing programs, why online? Why not strictly teach classes in traditional classrooms? Like anything else, many of the people going into nursing programs will be adults. They may already have a profession—they may be someone looking to shift into nursing as a profession, or they could well be a nurse looking to get a graduate degree—and need to set their own college class schedule around work, kids, you name it. That’s where you come in.

What does it take to become an online adjunct instructor of nursing? What is required of you? How much can you expect to get paid? Let’s answer these questions, each in turn.

Health Care Growth Means a Need for Online Teachers

Let’s start with a basic fact: there is a real need for nurses. The healthcare industry is growing and will continue to grow far into the foreseeable future. And a growth in the health care industry means, naturally, an increasing need for nurses—and obviously, that means a need to train nurses. Here is your foot in the door, as it were.

The numbers tell a lot of the (ever developing) story. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 16% growth in healthcare occupations between 2020 to 2030, which they figure will add about 2.6 million jobs. This growth is due, as you might suspect, to a large and aging population—the Baby Boomers, basically. The median annual wage, they report, for professions such as nurses was $69,870 in May, 2020.

cdc-vt7iAyiwpf0-unsplashThe growth of the healthcare industry will mean greater employment opportunities in healthcare professions than any other occupation, and that is coupled with the fact that the median wage for these professions—including nurses, physicians, dental hygienists—is also higher, on average, than any other wage in this country.

With wages above average and the mass opportunity for jobs, you can see why teaching will be a part of that growth. Colleges know this all too well, and so nursing programs are likewise growing. Many of the new jobs in teaching tomorrow’s nurses are actually taught online.

Now, you may ask, can you actually teach nursing online? The answer is an unqualified yes. Chamberlain College of Nursing, for example, is looking for candidates to begin teaching in March, 2022. They consider applicants with nursing licenses from any state—which is great! Remember, this is remote teaching, so losing the encumbrance of where you live is a plus.

Other schools may require state residency. Trine University in Indiana is an example. Other colleges hire for graduate programs. The Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (MCPHS) is looking for teachers to do just that.

So what do you need to do next? What can you expect of teaching nursing online? Let’s have a look.

Credentials Needed to Teach Nursing Online

First off, you’ll need the right credentials to teach as an online adjunct, and that will mean having the appropriate degrees, licensure, and experience—experience, that is, both as a teacher and as a nurse.

Like any other area of teaching, requirements will vary according to the college you apply to. But here are some basics you can expect.

  1. In some cases, you may need only a BSN degree, but more likely you’ll need an MSN degree. In some cases, a doctorate may be preferred or outright expected by the college.
  2. You’ll need an unencumbered RN nursing license—after all, the professional skill matters! In some cases, a college may ask for a multi-state license, and that would allow you, as I’ve suggested, to teach classes in another state.
  3. You’ll need to have practice experience, which is to say practice on-the-job—a hospital, a private practice, a clinic. Three years of experience is a good starting point.
  4. If you can get it, it’s good to have online teaching experience (or even teaching experience in general), which could amount to as little as one or two years—even as low as six months! Remember, there are more ways to get teaching experience and online teaching experience than through teaching college courses alone. If you have developed your own online course through a hospital you’ve worked at, that is experience that counts [could link here to a prior blog post about this topic].
  5. You’ll want to indicate your subject matter expertise. This is a no-brainer, but this gives you something to think about as you craft your CV and cover letter. Emphasize your expertise!
  6. Some colleges require a CNE, which is a certification in nurse education. This may be something you’ll want to get in the long run, as it could well open you up to other opportunities.

Every college is different, and specific job postings for teaching positions as an online adjunct faculty member will readily detail specific requirements asked for by this or that college. [again, could link here to your postings]

What Can I Teach?

hush-naidoo-jade-photography-pA0uoltkwao-unsplashA quick look at some listings for jobs may suggest the classes that need to be taught. MCPHS, in its graduate program, has courses to be taught in Family Nurse Practitioner specialties, and also in Advanced Pathophysiology, Advanced Pharmacology, Advanced Health assessment, and Advanced Role Development or Research. Chamberlain needs instructors for Nutrition, Health & Wellness. Nursing programs will likely want to be specific about advertising their needs, as nursing is a rigorous and extensive practice.

Courses may be introductory or higher level. The bottom line is, there are a lot of aspects of nursing to teach, and those can go for both undergraduate and graduate students. If you’re just starting out as an online adjunct (or even in the first couple years of your nursing career), you can look at undergraduate courses first, and then, as you gain experience in both teaching and nursing, and even manage to get a higher degree, you can begin to search for assignments teaching graduate students.

What Does an Online Adjunct Nursing Instructor Actually Do?

Again, a look at job listings will often tell you what you will be asked to do. Like any other teacher—especially of online classes—there are some key responsibilities. Address these in your cover letter.

One responsibility is advising and assisting students. This can be done through “office hours” (which can be flexible, as far as an online class goes, and many colleges will expect you to adhere to posted office hours) and, more specifically, through phone, email, and videoconference. No matter how you do it, as faculty you will schedule appointments with the student. Above all, you will act as a mentor.

You will deliver instruction through any combination of lecture, laboratory, and experiential instruction. You’ll create assignments that help students apply the knowledge you teach them to real-world applications. You may also maintain a discussion board, where you will post questions and respond to student answers.

You will use some sort of learning management system (an LMS), whether it be Blackboard, Moodle, or a system the college maintains. This is where your discussion board may reside, and it’s also where students can post assignments and where you will keep student grades.

Finally, you’ll need to do some basic teacher things: create a syllabus, make rubrics, and help develop and improve curriculum.

How Much Does an Online Nursing Instructor Get Paid?

ZipRecruiter reported, as of late October of 2021, that the average annual pay for an online nursing instructor in the U.S. is $65,353 a year. They found that the majority of the jobs range between $39,500 and $82,000 a year.

Here in Louisville, Kentucky, the outlook seems very good. ZipRecruiter says that for this area, the job market for online nursing faculty is “very active,” making only 5% less in salary than the national average. Among the highest paying cities are three cities in California’s Bay Area: San Francisco, Fremont, and San Jose. San Francisco pays some 24.8% more than the national average—more than $81,000 a year!

In fact, of the ten highest paying cities (six of which are in California), two are in Arkansas, one in Wyoming, and one in Connecticut. As ZipRecruiter points out, the lower cost of living in some states really stretches that salary. But again, you will be looking for remote teaching jobs, and you may already have a great cost-of-living!

First Steps to Getting an Online Nursing Teaching Job

As with any online adjunct teaching job, you’ll need to gather materials. More often than not, you’ll need a CV and a cover letter. With teaching nursing being a very particular kind of teaching—as opposed to, say, philosophy or poetry—you can expect a rigorous scrutiny over your credentials.

Your CV should demonstrate everything the college is asking of their applicants as requirements. List your college degrees. Include what kind of license you have, and in what state—if you have a multi-state license, tell them. All professional experience as a nurse should be included. Secondly, you’ll need to indicate any teaching experience. If you have taught for a college, if you have taught online, or both, include that information. As I’ve written before, “teaching experience” need not come only from college courses; leading workshops and courses on the job are important additions to your CV. [could link to the more generalized CV blog here]

bruno-rodrigues-279xIHymPYY-unsplashYour cover letter should make clear that you match the position’s qualifications. How do you engage students? In what ways do you honor diversity in the classroom? How do you moderate discussions? What is your experience with technology, and how does your industry knowledge factor into your teaching? Job descriptions will make explicit these questions; review them carefully. [could link to more generalized cover letter blog here]

If you can get certification in teaching online, do that! Some colleges ask for that certification. If they ask for a multi-state license, or if they simply ask you to get a license for their state (because you may live, of course, in another state), start the process to secure that license.

Once you have your CV and cover letter complete, be sure to line up your job references, and you’re ready to begin applying for jobs. Adjunct world posts online adjunct teaching jobs daily.

There is enormous opportunity to teach nursing, and because so many programs are online, that can make it easier for you. Being a nurse yourself, you know it’s a busy job. But with the right preparation—and a good dose of organization—you can make online adjunct teaching work for you.