Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

javier-sierra-6jopFhZkGGk-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member! Premium membership also offers bigger discounts on our professional development courses like OT101: Fundamentals of Online TeachingCD501: Foundations of Online Course Development, and OnRamp: A Practical Guide to Landing an Online Teaching Job.

This week we posted 22 Online Adjunct jobs from 15 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

3 Online Teaching Positions – Walden University

2 Online Teaching Positions – AIU Online

2 Online Teaching Positions – University of Arizona Global Campus

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: Arizona College of Nursing, Capella University, Community College of Baltimore County, CTU-Online, Eastern Oregon University, Jarvis University, John Melvin University, MCAD, National University, Purdue University Global, University of Maryland Global Campus, and Western Governors University.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplash

OT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated over 500 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, September 25th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $298, but use coupon code TEACH at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $208.60Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out (total premium member price + coupon = $154.96).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

Posted by & filed under Online Teaching Resources.

jason-goodman-vbxyFxlgpjM-unsplashOnline classrooms – now a mainstay in higher education – provide students and educators with unique opportunities to learn-by-collaboration. One powerful tool that fosters active engagement and critical thinking in virtual classrooms is well-crafted discussion prompts. By designing thoughtful and stimulating prompts, educators can create vibrant and dynamic online discussions that enhance the learning experience for all participants. Below, we explore the importance of effective discussion prompts and provide tips for crafting engaging ones that enrich the online learning environment.

The Power of Effective Discussion Prompts

Discussion forums are not “assignments” – they aren’t methods for quizzing our students or evaluating whether they have mastered a topic. These are learning opportunities or change moments. They are where students go to achieve that mastery that we will eventually assess via other means (essays, exams, projects, etc.). If we regard them as learning moments and not assignments, then are working with the right mindset. Again, we aren’t quizzing or evaluating here, we are inviting learning-through-conversation. We want students to have changed – either in perspective, confidence, or know-how – as a result of having participated in the discussion.

Well-designed prompts can:

  • Spark Curiosity: A thought-provoking question piques students’ interest and encourages them to explore the topic further.
  • Encourage Critical Thinking: Open-ended prompts prompt students to analyze and evaluate information, fostering the development of critical thinking skills.
  • Promote Collaboration: Discussion prompts that encourage students to share their perspectives and experiences and these insights facilitate meaningful interaction and collaboration among learners.
  • Enhance Communication Skills: Engaging in online discussions helps students improve their written communication skills, articulating their thoughts effectively.
  • Foster Inclusivity: Thoughtful prompts allow students from diverse backgrounds and experiences to participate and contribute to the conversation.

Tips for Crafting Engaging Discussion Prompts

no-revisions-UhpAf0ySwuk-unsplashOpen-Ended Questions: Avoid closed-ended questions that can be answered with a simple “yes” or “no.” Instead, create open-ended questions that require thoughtful responses and encourage deeper exploration.

  • Example: “How might advancements in AI impact the job market over the next decade? Provide examples to support your perspective.”

Real-World Relevance: Frame prompts that connect course material to real-life situations, encouraging students to see the practical implications of what they are learning.

  • Example: “Reflect on a recent news article that relates to our discussion on climate change. How does the scientific evidence presented in the article align with the concepts we’ve covered in class?”

Multidisciplinary Approach: Incorporate diverse perspectives by integrating elements from different disciplines. This approach encourages students to approach problems from various angles.

  • Example: “Explore the ethical dilemmas posed by advances in genetic engineering, drawing on insights from both biology and philosophy.”

Relate to Personal Experiences: Encourage students to reflect on their own experiences or observations, fostering a more personalized and engaging discussion.

  • Example: “Share an example from your own life where effective communication played a significant role in resolving a conflict. What lessons did you learn from that experience?”

Present Controversial Topics: Introduce topics with multiple viewpoints and controversies, promoting healthy debates and critical analysis.

  • Example: “What are the arguments for and against the use of social media in political campaigns? How might it impact the democratic process?”

Visual Prompts: Incorporate images, infographics, or short videos into prompts to stimulate visual thinking and creativity.

  • Example: Share an image related to urbanization and ask students to discuss the potential challenges and benefits of urban development.

And ideally, of course, a prompt can do several of the above at the same time:

  • Example: Compare where you fall on each of the five factors on the Big Five Personality assessment and compare your results to someone you tend to not get along with (personalization). Given this information, why do you all tend to butt heads? (open-ended question). How might you use this information and insight in your next interaction with this person (real-world relevance).

Conclusion

annie-spratt-hCb3lIB8L8E-unsplash (1)Effective discussion prompts are invaluable tools in online classrooms, empowering students to actively engage with course content, think critically, and collaborate with their peers. By crafting open-ended, relevant, and thought-provoking prompts, educators can create an enriching and inclusive learning environment where students feel encouraged to share their ideas and insights without the distracting, unproductive stress that comes along with “getting the answer wrong – publicly”. Engaging minds, opening doors, and alleviating performance anxiety through well-designed discussion prompts not only enhances the learning experience but also cultivates essential skills that students can carry with them beyond the virtual classroom.

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

junior-ferreira-7esRPTt38nI-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member! Premium membership also offers bigger discounts on our professional development courses like OT101: Fundamentals of Online TeachingCD501: Foundations of Online Course Development, and OnRamp: A Practical Guide to Landing an Online Teaching Job.

This week we posted 34 Online Adjunct jobs from 21 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

4 Online Teaching Positions – Columbia College

4 Online Teaching Positions – Western Governors University

3 Online Teaching Positions – University of Arizona Global Campus

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: AIU Online, Bethany College, Bryan University, California Baptist University, Capella University, Concorde Career Colleges, Dakota College at Bottineau, Franklin University, Logan University, National University, Purdue University Global, Regent University, Saybrook University, Simmons University, St. Louis Community College, Trine University, University of Phoenix, and Walden University.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplash

OT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated over 500 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, September 25th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $298, but use coupon code TEACH at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $208.60Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out (total premium member price + coupon = $154.96).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

Posted by & filed under Online Teaching Resources.

hannah-busing-Zyx1bK9mqmA-unsplash (1)Asynchronous online classrooms offer a flexible and convenient learning experience for diverse groups of learners. While you might think that the absence of real-time interaction can pose a challenge in establishing a sense of community among students and instructors, the asynchronous learning environment is rife with opportunities to community-build. Creating a supportive and connected learning environment is crucial for fostering engagement and enhancing the overall learning experience. In this blog post, we will explore effective strategies for creating a vibrant community in an asynchronous online classroom.

Cultivate a Welcoming Virtual Space

Start by setting the tone for a warm and inclusive virtual space. Create a welcome message or video that greets students as they enter the course platform. Encourage students to introduce themselves on discussion boards or forums, sharing their interests, aspirations, and a fun fact about themselves. By doing so, you will promote a sense of belonging and encourage students to view the online classroom as a safe and friendly place to connect. This type of exercise gives instructors a great deal of data they can use to personalize the learning experience for each student. Remember that Jane mentioned in her intro that she wants to be an occupational therapist? Then whenever something comes up in future class discussion or handed-in assignment that bears on this goal, the instructor can reinforce Jane’s motivation toward that particular goal.

Establish Clear Communication Channels

Effective communication is the backbone of any successful online community. Clearly outline the various communication channels available to students, such as email, discussion forums, messaging systems, or virtual office hours. Promptly respond to queries and provide constructive feedback to ensure that students feel heard and supported throughout their learning journey. The instructor is a very important part of the online community and serves as an important model for engagement and interactivity. This is the main responsibility instructors take on when they teach online, not “extra work” that they do.

Foster Peer Interaction

christina-wocintechchat-com-LQ1t-8Ms5PY-unsplashIn an asynchronous setting, creating opportunities for peer-to-peer interaction is paramount. Encourage collaborative activities, group discussions, and virtual study groups. Assigning group projects that require students to work together fosters teamwork and helps build connections beyond the course content. Additionally, periodically organize virtual social events, such as online game nights or virtual coffee breaks, to facilitate informal interactions among students. At many schools, students – especially those enrolled in the same program or major – will be in many of the same classes. So, helping them form relationships with each other in your class can set a good stage for meaningful learning experiences in other courses as well.

Incorporate Video Elements

While the course may be asynchronous, incorporating occasional video elements can add a personal touch to the learning experience. Consider recording short video announcements, summaries of key concepts, or mini-lectures. Sharing your facial expressions and voice can make a significant impact, helping students feel more connected to you as the instructor. Having students post videos might tax the storage capabilities of the school’s LMS, but you can encourage synchronous video conversations (between students and the instructor, and between the students themselves) as a way of helping student interact “face to face” with each other.

Celebrate Student Achievements

Recognize and celebrate student achievements, both big and small. Acknowledge assignments that go above and beyond, milestones, or active participation in discussions. Highlighting students’ accomplishments through personalized messages boosts their confidence and reinforces a positive learning environment. They also get the sense that they are seen and that the instructor cares. Students care more when they perceived they are cared for, and we can leverage this dynamic in service of each student’s success.

Promote Reflective Discussions

laurenz-kleinheider-OsC8HauR0e0-unsplashEncourage thought-provoking discussions that prompt students to reflect on their learning experiences and share insights. Pose open-ended questions related to real-world applications of course concepts or how they relate to current events. This approach not only deepens understanding but also encourages engagement and critical thinking. Remember, this is ultimately the point of all discussion boards; these aren’t evaluations of learning. These aren’t “assignments.” These are learning tools – places where students to go reinforce and deepen their understanding. Thus, the best discussion prompts will be those that did not have a “right answer,” but instead encourage application and reflection and – yes – mistakes.

Share Personal Stories and Experiences

As an instructor, don’t be afraid to share personal stories or experiences related to the course content. Relatable anecdotes can humanize the learning experience and create a connection between you and your students. When students see that you are approachable and have experienced similar challenges, they may feel more comfortable engaging with the course material and sharing their own anecdotes, helping them make strong neural connections between previous experience/knowledge and newly acquired information.

Conclusion

In an asynchronous online classroom, community building goes beyond just academic engagement; it is about fostering connections, encouraging collaboration, and nurturing a supportive environment. By cultivating a welcoming space, establishing clear communication channels, promoting peer interaction, incorporating video elements, celebrating achievements, encouraging reflective discussions, and sharing personal stories, instructors can successfully create a vibrant and connected community in the digital landscape. Ultimately, building a sense of community will enhance student motivation, participation, and overall satisfaction, transforming the asynchronous online classroom into an enriching and fulfilling learning experience for all involved.

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

jazmin-quaynor-7Hu4iWksw2k-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member! Premium membership also offers bigger discounts on our professional development courses like OT101: Fundamentals of Online TeachingCD501: Foundations of Online Course Development, and OnRamp: A Practical Guide to Landing an Online Teaching Job.

This week we posted 50 Online Adjunct jobs from 20 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

10 Online Teaching Positions – Western Governors University

9 Online Teaching Positions – Unity College

4 Online Teaching Positions – Southern New Hampshire University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: AIU Online, Arizona College of Nursing, Capella University, Carroll University, ECPI University, Grand Canyon University, MCPHS, Murray State University, National University, Purdue University Global, Roosevelt University, South College, Strayer University, Syracuse University, University of Arizona Global Campus, University of the Cumberlands, and West Shore Community College.

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplash

OT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated over 500 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, September 25th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $298, but use coupon code TEACH at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $208.60Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out (total premium member price + coupon = $154.96).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

Posted by & filed under Online Teaching Resources.

jeswin-thomas-dfRrpfYD8Iw-unsplashExperience and research have shown us time and time again that the critical component of any successful online course is student engagement. The more students are actively involved in their online course work, the better they perform, the more enjoyable they find the course, and the more likely they are to continue on to graduation. As online teachers, we are not only “disseminators of knowledge,” but we must also inspire curiosity, critical thinking, and creativity in our learners. As Bloom’s famous taxonomy would put it, “We don’t just stop at the base of our pyramid – we reach all the way to the top. Students must know and comprehend, for sure, but true learning doesn’t happen unless we apply, synthesize, evaluate, and create.”

One of the best ways to engage students is to create an active learning environment for them; a fun, collaborative, exciting online class experience that lights up all the lobes of the brain. This environment is neurologically rich and diverse, facilitating deeper learning. The purpose of this article is to highlight how to leverage active learning strategies in the online classroom – and how these strategies empower our students, propelling them even further in their academic and career goals.

What is Active Learning?

Active learning requires students to step out of the traditional “passive learner” role and into being active participants in their own learning process. Rather than (or in addition to) receiving information passively via lecture or textbook, students who are actively learning engage in mindfully crafted activities that exercise their critical thinking ability, require dynamic collaboration, and provide “real world” application of what they are learning. This approach enhances retention, understanding, and overall student satisfaction.

Leveraging Interactivity

compare-fibre-fRGoTJFQAHM-unsplashIn the distance learning environment, one of the most effective ways of activating our students is to provide plenty of opportunities for interactivity – between the students themselves, between the students and the instructor, and between the students and the material. Some examples include:

  • Asynchronous Discussion Forums: Create online discussion areas where students can express their thoughts, ask questions, and debate topics related to the course material. Encourage active participation by assigning roles or facilitating the conversation. Remember that discussion forums are not places where students “show they know something.” While they may be graded, they are not assignments, really. They are opportunities for learning. A place where mistakes are okay.
  • Polls and Surveys: Use real-time polls and surveys during synchronous lectures or asynchronous communications (announcements, emails, discussion posts) to gauge students’ understanding, gather opinions, and encourage reflection.
  • Group Projects: Assign collaborative projects where students work together, share ideas, pool their experience and individual resources, and solve problems together. Group work builds teamwork skills and fosters camaraderie that inspires students to log in more than they may otherwise.
  • Interactive Quizzes: Create engaging quizzes that challenge students to apply their knowledge and receive immediate feedback, reinforcing their understanding.

Implementing Multimedia Resources

Neurons that fire together, wire together. We learn best when our visual, auditory, language, and memories centers are all firing in unison, which suggests that we need to provide our students with enriching multimedia learning resources. These include:

  • Video Lectures: Record concise and engaging video “micro” lectures that cover complex topics, breaking them down into manageable segments – 10 minutes or less! Visual aids, animations, and demonstrations can enhance comprehension.
  • Virtual Field Trips: Take students on virtual field trips, exploring relevant sites or conducting lab simulations, offering an immersive experience that supplements theoretical learning.
  • Guest Speakers and Webinars: Organize webinars or invite engaging guest speakers to share real-world insights and experiences, inspiring students to apply their knowledge to practical scenarios.

Encouraging Self-Assessment and Reflection

caroline-veronez-bbjmFMdWYfw-unsplashIncorporate self-assessment and reflection activities into your online courses. Encourage students to review their progress regularly, set personal learning goals, and reflect on their strengths and areas for improvement. This self-awareness empowers students to take ownership of their learning journey. You can give assignments that are specifically self-reflective in nature (i.e., a weekly journal or a beginning and/or end-of-course reflection) and you can also embed self-reflection into other assignments, like within your weekly discussion forum prompts (i.e., “Identify something you found particularly interesting in this week’s reading and explain why it resonated with you.” Or “What questions were you left with after watching the TED talk assigned this week?” or “This week you learned about X, Y, or Z theory – how did it strike you? What was your reaction to it?”).

Providing Timely, Supportive Feedback

Prompt and constructive feedback is essential to reinforce active learning efforts. Offer personalized feedback on assignments, discussions, and assessments, acknowledging students’ strengths and providing supportive guidance for growth. Do not think of yourself as a “grader” – think of feedback as a conversation and an important learning moment for each individual learner. Additionally, be available for one-on-one virtual consultations to address questions or concerns.

Conclusion

In the digital age, active learning has proven to be a powerful online teaching best practice. By incorporating interactive elements, multimedia resources, and fostering a supportive learning environment, educators inspire students to become active participants in their education. Embracing active learning not only enhances student engagement and retention but also cultivates critical thinking and problem-solving skills that are invaluable for their academic and professional journey. Indeed, information, knowledge, and simple “book learning” is way too easy to come by in a world where the answers are at our fingertips. The most successful among us will be those who can take that information and use it creatively and with ingenuity, purpose, wisdom, and confidence. These are the types of people online instructors are tasked with molding, and one of the best ways to do that is by harnessing the power of active learning.

To Learn More…

At AdjunctWorld we offer two certificate courses intended to help you increase your understanding of online teaching best practices (OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching) and best practices in online course creation and design (CD501: Foundations of Online Course Development). Click the links to learn more and to see when our next cohorts launch. We’d love to have you! Join the over 500 members of our community who’ve improved their online teaching skills (and shored up their online teaching job resume!) with our professional development courses.

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

iewek-gnos-hhUx08PuYpc-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member! Premium membership also offers bigger discounts on our professional development courses like OT101: Fundamentals of Online TeachingCD501: Foundations of Online Course Development, and OnRamp: A Practical Guide to Landing an Online Teaching Job.

This week we posted 52 Online Adjunct jobs from 26 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

7 Online Teaching Positions – Southern New Hampshire University

7 Online Teaching Positions – Houston Baptist University

4 Online Teaching Positions – Western Governors University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: Arizona College of Nursing, Bay Mills Community College, Bellevue University, Bryan University, City Colleges of Chicago, Columbia College, CTU-Online, Dallas College, Drexel University, Eastern Oregon University, Galen College of Nursing, Indiana Wesleyan University, Marymount University, National University, Purdue University Global, The Colleges of Law, UMass Global, Unity College, University of Arizona Global Campus, University of Phoenix, University of the People, Walden University, and Wilkes University.

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplash

OT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated over 500 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, September 25th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $298, but use coupon code TEACH at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $208.60Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out (total premium member price + coupon = $154.96).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

Posted by & filed under Online Teaching Resources.

mimi-thian-vdXMSiX-n6M-unsplashI once sat through a new faculty hire orientation where one of the speakers spoke at length about test integrity, emphasizing how we should prohibit students from working on exams with each other (the standard exam instructions at this school say that if the student is caught doing so, they will be reported to the proper disciplinary office). I sat on my hands during this because it was obvious that the school took this very seriously. I didn’t say a word, but I really, really wanted to. Because what kept popping up in my head was this: “Why would that be a bad thing?” Or, at least, would it be a bad thing in all cases? Could there be some nuance here?

Because I could picture it. A table of four students sitting down with their lattes and laptops at the library, each with their textbook out, arguing the relative merits of one answer vs. another until they ultimately arrive at an answer based on the output of their productive conversation. That sounds like what higher education should be like. That sounds like an amazing collaborative learning opportunity. Why do we have to call this “cheating?” Is that a fair descriptor – at least in all instances? Even online, if students were to get on a video call on their own time and do this same thing virtually, in some situations, it could be a great and engaging, collaborative learning moment, not one that should be overtly discouraged in the exam instructions. Again, at least in all instances.

I’m not alone in this. There have been some research studies conducted on the value of collaborative exams in higher education. For example, Eaton (2009) tested two different collaborative exam protocols in a geoscience course. One of the conditions provided an incentive for working together. This was known as the “jackpot effect” whereby if a student knew the right answer, but then changed it to concede to the group, then they still got their point for their “wrong” answer (that was originally “right”). This meant that there was nothing lost by working on the exam with others – it could only improve an individual student’s grade, not hurt it. In the other condition, there was no jackpot effect, but the exams themselves weren’t worth large of a chunk of the students’ overall course grades.

Both conditions showed a significant positive net effect on student learning. Obviously, students who weren’t as academically strong benefited from the collaboration, but the results of this study suggest that the performance of higher-achieving students also benefited from collaborative exam-taking. In addition to the obvious learning advantages of test collaboration, the author makes a terrific point when concluding, “Wider application of these methods could make a critical difference in reversing student apathy toward science in colleges and universities” (Eaton, 2009 pg. 113).

Whether collaborative exams would work in any particular instance depends on a variety of factors – your personal teaching philosophy, your schools rules and regulations, the purpose of the exam, and perhaps this is a concept that molds better to some disciplines than others. But there is an option here to broaden our reactions to students “working together” on an exam. One person’s “cheating” can be another person’s powerful, engaging, collaborative learning moment. And, to be fair, vice versa. But a consideration nonetheless!

REFERENCE:

Eaton, T. (2009). Engaging students and evaluating learning progress using collaborative exams in introductory courses. Journal of Geoscience Education, 57(2), 113-120.

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

benjamin-dada-EDZTb2SQ6j0-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member! Premium membership also offers bigger discounts on our professional development courses like OT101: Fundamentals of Online TeachingCD501: Foundations of Online Course Development, and OnRamp: A Practical Guide to Landing an Online Teaching Job.

This week we posted 45 Online Adjunct jobs from 26 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

6 Online Teaching Positions – Rasmussen University

4 Online Teaching Positions – Regis College

4 Online Teaching Positions – Strayer University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: American College of Education, American Public University System, Chamberlain University, City College of Chicago, Clark College, CTU-Online, Drexel University, Eastern Oregon University, Greensboro College, Independence Community College, Murray State University, National University, Pittsburgh Technical College, Purdue University Global, South University, Southern New Hampshire University, Trident University International, Trine University, University of Arizona Global Campus, University of Maryland Global Campus, University of the People, Wake Forest University, and Western Governors University.

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplash

OT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated over 500 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, September 25th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $298, but use coupon code TEACH at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $208.60Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out (total premium member price + coupon = $154.96).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

Posted by & filed under AdjunctWorld Resources.

tim-gouw-bwki71ap-y8-unsplashThis is one of the most common questions members of our community ask: Am I qualified to teach online college courses? Obviously, there is no one size fits all answer to this question. So much depends on variables such as what discipline you teach in and the competitiveness within that area, whether you are looking to teach undergraduate or graduate courses, differences in standards across accrediting bodies, etc. Some schools are pickier than others, taking what their accrediting body requires and then upping the ante a little bit. Some schools are perfectly content with the accreditation minimum.

However! Generally speaking, there are a handful of “must haves” and a few “would help to haves” that can help you determine whether or not you are a strong candidate for teaching online college courses. We’ll list those below:

Online Teaching Qualifications: Must Haves

Education required to teach undergraduate courses: The bare minimum qualifications required to teach undergraduate college courses, as set by the largest accrediting body (SACSCOC) is a master’s degree (in anything) plus at least 18 graduate semester credit hours in the discipline you are looking to each in.

So, for example, if you want to teach undergraduate math courses and you have a Master of Divinity, you are qualified (in terms of education, anyway) to teach math courses if you can document on your transcript that you have at least 18 graduate semester hours in the field of mathematics. In short, the master’s degree is the minimum required degree (for most accredited schools – the bachelor’s might be acceptable at unaccredited institutions/programs), but it doesn’t necessarily have to be in the subject you wish to teach. If you have a master’s in anything, you are minimally qualified to teach undergraduate courses online – either in the field your degree is in or any field that have 18 graduate credit hours in (as documented on your transcript).

esther-tuttle-MnRXX76faXM-unsplashSchools are welcome to require “above the minimum.” For example, some SACSCOC-accredited schools will only accept applications from those who have a master’s degree in the specific field they are needing taught. In other words, if they are hiring someone to teach undergraduate business courses, they may require an MBA or other business-related master’s degree. Schools are even at liberty to require a doctorate to teach undergraduate courses. Not many do, but they still can.

Education required to teach graduate courses: The minimum requirement for teaching graduate-level courses at a university, as set by the SACSCOC, is a terminal/doctorate degree in the specific field being taught. If you are wanting to teach graduate courses, you probably need a doctorate degree. Not all schools are accredited or accredited by the SACSCOC, and thus not all graduate programs require their faculty to have doctoral degrees, but many follow in its footsteps. The use of the word “terminal” is important, too. While the doctorate is the terminal degree in most industries, it isn’t necessarily the terminal degree in all disciplines. For example, the MFA is the terminal degree in the area of fine arts.

Your education is the “must have” as far as bare minimum requirements. If you have a master’s degree, it is possible for you to break into the world of online instruction. However, it would be easier if you have one or more of the following “would help to haves” on board.

Online Teaching Qualifications: The “Would Help to Haves”

On-ground teaching experience (within higher-ed): While schools are most definitely hiring you for your subject matter expertise, it also helps them know that you are an experienced educator in some capacity – that you know how to translate what you know so that novice learners can grasp it and learn from you. If you have on-ground teaching experience at any college or university – this is a bonus, and you should play it up in your CV and cover letter.

Online teaching experience (within higher-ed): Online teaching experience is golden. If you have ever taught online, even if you were a teaching assistant (TA) or a volunteer online instructor (like at the University of the People), this counts as online teaching experience. You should scream this loud and proud in your CV and cover letter. Schools can relax a bit if they are hiring someone who has done the job before.

On-ground and online teaching experience (within your industry): Within your non-teaching, industry-focused career, you may have held a teaching role. Maybe you’ve trained large groups on new software, led leadership seminars, or taught at the police academy. These experiences, while they may not pack the punch of higher ed teaching experience are still helpful to have and should be highlighted in your application materials – especially if you ever hosted these courses online (either synchronously over Zoom or Teams or asynchronously via an LMS).

Learning management system (LMS) experience: Most schools host their online courses on a learning management system of some form. The most popular LMSs are Blackboard, Canvas, Brightspace/D2L, and Moodle. If you have some familiarity with these systems, as a student, as an instructor, or as someone who has opted into some LMS training in preparation for teaching online, then you will want to make sure to include that in your application documents.

Other technologies: Minimally, you will want to be familiar with Microsoft Office Tools, email, and be savvy with most synchronous video chat platforms, like WebX, MSTeams, and Zoom. Proficiencies in industry-specific technologies, like QuickBooks for accountants and SPSS for statistics instructors, are also helpful/important.

bruno-rodrigues-279xIHymPYY-unsplashCourse development experience: In distance education, it is a very common practice for teaching and course development to be separate. Trained instructional designers and subject matter experts pair up to create a solid, effective online course based on today’s research in online course development best practices. Then, instructors are hired to teach those courses. If you have experiences on both sides of this fence, whether in higher ed or in your industry (although higher ed experience will always shine a bit brighter) then that’s something to emphasize. A school could hire you and you could both help design courses and teach them.

Subject matter expertise/Industry experience: The required degree assumes you have some subject matter expertise. You went to school long enough to earn the degree; you are somewhat of an expert. But subject matter expertise is indeed strengthened by “real world” experience. Having worked in your industry and having earned various other industry-related certifications in your career is something a lot of schools look for. Their students are career-focused, and they do not necessarily want to learn from someone who has been holed up in the Ivory Tower. They want to learn from someone who is doing the job they want to do. If you have a degree in an area, but no corresponding industry experience it may be harder – but not impossible – to break into online higher ed.

Interpersonal skills: Online teaching is a very high-touch, soft-skill dependent job. There are a number of interpersonal skills that are critical to effective online delivery. For a list of those, you can see our blog post titled: 4 Interpersonal Skills for Effective Online Teaching.

Online Teaching Qualifications – The Most Critical Component: Emphasis on Student-Centered Learning

You can have the shiniest CV and cover letter on the face of the earth – one that checks each and every box above. But! If you don’t come across as someone who understands the unique needs of the online learner population (who are primarily working adults), who doesn’t understand the gravity and responsibility inherent in online teaching, who isn’t flexible, and who doesn’t emphasize the importance of collaboration, discussion, and faculty involvement/presence, then you might not get the job. While you want to be clear and confident in your experience and expertise, you also want to focus on the students. You do not want to come across as someone who is over-emphasizing their own credentials while under-emphasizing the students. Schools work very hard and spend a lot of money to recruit and retain their learners. They need to make sure that the faculty they hire will nurture them, and this requires you to tell the schools how you would do that – in your application documents.

brooke-cagle-WHWYBmtn3_0-unsplash (2)You do not have to have taught online before to convey your student-centered teaching philosophy. If you seek out training in today’s best practices in online teaching and online course development, you can document your training in your application materials and demonstrate your learning/understanding in your cover letter, objective statement, and statement of teaching philosophy. I know a lot of people who have studied online teaching and who understand the needs of the online learner a lot more than those who have been teaching online for years! At AdjunctWorld we offer two online certificate courses that emphasize online teaching best practices (OT101) and effective online course development (CD501). You can click those respective links to learn more about those training courses and when they are offered.

If you are interested in learning more about entering into the world of online education and how to present your background in the best light on your application documents (your CV, cover letter, Statement of Teaching Philosophy, interview responses, etc.) then consider joining us for our next cohort of OnRamp: A Practical Guide to Landing an Online Teaching Job.