Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

nguyen-dang-hoang-nhu-dYUQI3dM4R4-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 43 Online Adjunct jobs from 34 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

4 Online Teaching Positions – Lees-McRae College

3 Online Teaching Positions – Syracuse University

2 Online Teaching Positions – Franklin University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: American Public University System, Bay College, Bellevue University, Belmont Abbey College, Bryan University, Capella University, Capitol Technology University, Centenary University, Des Moines Area Community College, ECPI University, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Grand Canyon University, Husson University, Johns Hopkins University, Kirtland Community College, Liberty University, MCPHS, Naropa University, Northeast Electric Power University, Point University, Purdue University Global, Rize Education, Savannah College of Art and Design, Saybrook University, Southern New Hampshire University, Strayer University, Wake Forest University, West Georgia Technical College, Western Governors University, Western Technical College, and Young Harris College.

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

danielle-macinnes-IuLgi9PWETU-unsplash (1)Each week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 57 Online Adjunct jobs from 23 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

14 Online Teaching Positions – University of Maryland Global Campus

9 Online Teaching Positions – Southern New Hampshire University

4 Online Teaching Positions – Northeast Electric Power University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: Baker College, Bay Path University, Beyond Campus Innovations, Bowling Green State University, Bryant & Stratton College, CTU-Online, Eastern Oregon University, Florida International University, Galen College of Nursing, Indiana Wesleyan University, Kirtland Community College, Profhire, Inc., Rasmussen College, Rowan-Cabarrus Community College, Southern California University of Health Sciences, Syracuse University, United States University, University of Maine at Augusta, University of the Western States, and Western Governors University.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Last run of OT101 in 2021! Register Today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated over 400 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of
OT101 starts Monday, November 8th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $198, but use coupon code LEARN at check out for 20% off, bringing your price down to $158.40. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($118.80).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Online Teaching Resources.

If you’ve been looking at media reports of the life of an adjunct college instructor, you’ve no doubt been made privy to all the, well, controversy. And a lot of people will say that being an adjunct—let alone an online adjunct—just isn’t worth it. But you ought to know up front: there’s a difference with the online adjunct.

javier-sierra-6jopFhZkGGk-unsplashThere are definite differences between a part-time adjunct instructor, including those that teach exclusively online, and a full-time, tenured faculty member. Much of the discussion of those differences has been given over to specific points like salary and health benefits. Whether you decide to pursue a career in adjunct teaching depends largely on what you want. There are differences, too, between an “on-ground” adjunct and an online adjunct.

There are benefits to being an online adjunct instructor. The time you commit to the job, particularly if you want control over your time, is one. The freedom from faculty responsibilities is another. Flexibility, which can range far beyond your career, is yet another.

Each of these reasons deserves some consideration. To enter the world of online adjunct teaching is a choice, and it is one that deserves your full consideration. If you’re truly considering teaching part-time as an online instructor, then let’s look at each benefit in turn.

The Benefits of Teaching Online Courses are Many

 The Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions (n.d.) posted five benefits to teaching online, based on what online instructors have to say about it.

  1. It’s convenient and flexible: Teachers can teach during non-traditional class times and from anywhere they have Internet access.
  2. More opportunity to get to know your students: The online course invites those who may be more comfortable in the distanced environment, increasing the number of perspectives that contribute to discussions.
  3. Opportunities for engagement and reflection: In an online course, students have more time to reflect and respond to discussion threads, and the instructor—you—get to see those well-thought-out responses. Because participation and discussion is a required part of distance education, no one can really hide in the back of the room. The online classroom thus engages everyone.
  4. Efficiency: Some systems use automated processes that will save time; for example, the D2L Quiz tool an instructor might use to reduce grading time.
  5. Instructors find the diversity enriching: The instructor’s experience, not to mention that of the students, is broadened when interacting with students from across the country, even from around the world.

Let’s look in detail at some of these benefits.

Teaching Part-Time, Not All the Time

icons8-team-dhZtNlvNE8M-unsplashThe responsibilities of a tenure-track professor are weighty. For many, the path to tenure requires work that exceeds that of actual teaching. Publishing, for example, requires a great deal of effort that is not required of part-time faculty, and as such, they are spared the research that goes with tenure territory. That research, as well as the pursuit of publications, are generally assembled into a portfolio that requires peer review. There is no such requirement for the online adjunct instructor—save a general teaching portfolio that they can assemble themselves.

The full-time faculty member is also subject to administrative duties that fall outside their teaching. The part-time instructor is spared these duties, as well, and so the majority of their attention is placed entirely on the course they are teaching. Aside from office hours, classroom meetings, and required institutional trainings the adjunct teacher need not commit to panels, boards, or committees.

There is no doubt that teaching an online class is itself a weighty responsibility, but so long as one gives all their attention to the class—in a fashion that best maximizes and economizes their time and effort—they won’t be distracted by outside pressures.

The Flexibility of Teaching as an Online Adjunct Instructor

 Being a part-time adjunct instructor entails, to at least a certain degree, a great deal of flexibility. If one teaches a class with a regular meeting time—a synchronous course, where a class may last perhaps an hour or two, sometimes more—then one must shape their schedules to that meeting time; full-time lecturing faculty will certainly need to do that, as well.

But if an online class does not have a regular meeting time, and if the class is asynchronous, meaning the schedule is dictated not by regular meeting times but due dates for assignments and discussion board responses, then there can be a great deal of flexibility. The online adjunct teacher can determine for themselves when they will be involved.

It can take a moment on a Monday morning to post a question for students, and from there, the instructor can determine when he or she will respond to student comments. Or, the online adjunct can make the conversation entirely student-centered! The online adjunct can also determine how much they will respond; if they have a lot to say and feel they have the time, they may respond extensively. If not, they may choose to leave much of the discussion to students, interjecting salient points here and there while maintaining an active presence overall.

The Flexibility of Choosing Courses and Colleges

robert-anasch-ZFYg5jTvB4A-unsplashThe deeper flexibility for the online adjunct instructor can reside in more simple decisions like how many courses they want to take on. With proper research into what a course entails—what will be expected of the students by the college to meet the requirements for the class credits—the teacher can determine how much they might reasonably be willing to take on. If you are in a situation where teaching one or two classes is feasible, you can. If you can handle more, you can do that, too.

In many cases, depending on what part of the country you live in, you may find yourself with choices as to where you want to teach—which is to say, which college. Larger cities frequently have several to choose from, and you may be able to teach regionally, as well, without leaving your home. Remember, we are talking about online courses here! Commuting will be expunged from your daily plan!

You are free, therefore, to choose courses to teach at several colleges. This can help you balance out responsibilities and salaries. It may also afford you choices in which courses you might teach.

As Todd Wallis writes in Inside Scholar, the Online Adjunct Professor might begin to consider themselves to be an Adjunct Entrepreneur. “In many ways,” he says, “adjunct professors are already free agents who should leverage their skills and experience as a professor to seek out higher-paying opportunities in the nonprofit or corporate world. But it all begins with a shift in mindset: adjunct professors have to start seeing themselves as adjunct entrepreneurs, not poorly paid, part-time teachers with no other options.”

This is an incredible and necessary mind shift. In a way, approaching the job market this way is little different from being a freelance writer, or a freelance designer: You are in control of what contracts you take on. It takes time, of course, to hunt down those contracts, and it may even take a few years to get the machine fully going. Start now!

Other Benefits to Teaching Online

There may be more benefits to being an online adjunct instructor than one might expect! For example, being an adjunct instructor at SUNY Orange—Orange County Community College—entitles the adjunct to take two credit-bearing courses per academic year free of charge. Eligible dependents of the adjunct may receive reduced tuition at the college. Professional development courses are offered through the human resources department, and the Learning Resource Center is open to adjuncts. Adjuncts can even use the Physical Education facilities.

Seminole State College in Florida offers an adjunct faculty award for excellence—attached to a monetary award! And I cannot emphasize enough how valuable it is for an adjunct to receive such recognitions.

Obviously, there are challenges to teaching online. One must understand technology and know-how to optimize its use. Facilitating discussions over the internet is markedly different from seeing a room of students before you. Goals, activities, and assessments all must be created specific to an online environment, where building the community that is the class will be very different.

But online adjunct teaching does not need to be a Herculean effort. If the class is outlined properly, and the students engaged, the benefits can prove lucrative, indeed.

References:

Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions (n.d.). Benefits and Challenges of Online Instruction. https://www.mghihp.edu/faculty-staff-faculty-compass-teaching/benefits-and-challenges-online-instruction

Wallis, T. (n.d.). Hidden Benefits for Adjunct Instructors. InsideScholar.com.

Posted by & filed under AdjunctWorld Resources.

sigmund-YUuSAJkS3U4-unsplashAn adjunct instructor at a college or university (also referred to as adjunct faculty or adjunct professor) is a contract-based, part-time teacher. Their jobs as classroom instructors don’t differ tremendously from regular, tenure-track faculty. But the job of an online adjunct instructor differs in important ways from that of an on-ground teacher who is tasked with lecturing on specific days of the week in a physical classroom. What is it that online adjunct instructors do? What makes them unique?

Online adjunct faculty teach college courses exclusively in an online environment. Though many of the tasks of college faculty remain the same—evaluation of student performance, curriculum development, and student conferences to name a few—the delivery of the coursework happens in an online environment. This changes the job dynamics significantly!

There are freedoms and limitations to teaching in an online environment, just as there are challenges and rewards. Let’s take a look at the life of an online adjunct instructor, how their classes work, and how the schedule accommodates all participants.

What Do All Faculty – Online and On-Ground – Have in Common?

If you’re asking yourself, “So what does an online adjunct instructor actually do for their job?” it’s important to know that their work doesn’t differ too dramatically from a regular, full-time, tenure-track faculty member’s. They rarely differ from other on-ground adjunct instructors, either. All professors, at least as far as classroom teaching and interacting with students, do the same thing, essentially.

dom-fou-YRMWVcdyhmI-unsplashThey teach. They just do so in different ways is all.

All teachers have to develop a curriculum. For most online adjunct teachers, the curriculum is most likely already developed by the department they work for; in other cases, the online teacher may have to create their own. The school may prefer a specific textbook be used, but some online instructors may choose their own course materials. In either case, teachers need to lay out a plan for the semester, identifying learning objectives and making the requisite lesson plans to suit the curriculum.

With a curriculum under their belt, an online adjunct instructor will have to develop and deliver a syllabus to students. They will need to provide rubrics for evaluation, guidelines for assignments, and a calendar of lessons with due dates. If the course is synchronous, the online adjunct instructor will have to lead live, online class meetings with lectures and discussions. If the course is asynchronous, the online instructor still teaches and leads class discussions, just a little differently (more on that below). The online adjunct instructor will meet with students and evaluate their work, providing detailed, formative feedback intended to help them develop their skills and knowledge.

So far, so good; we can see that the online adjunct instructor doesn’t differ too markedly from traditional on-ground faculty. What the online adjunct instructor does have to do that differs from a traditional in-class teacher is to deliver the whole of their course in an online environment. So what does that look like, typically?

What the Online Adjunct Instructor Does That’s Different

For one, the online adjunct instructor will need to lead their course entirely online. What this looks like depends on whether the course is asynchronous or synchronous.

Synchronous online courses follow a traditional on-campus model in that the class meets at specified times during the week (i.e. MWF from 9 to 9:50 am) for live lecture and discussion. The school will typically provide a platform for these live discussions, like Zoom, Google Classroom, Blackboard Collaborate, or Microsoft Teams. All students are expected to log on during class times to attend the instructor’s live lecture and participate in live class discussions.

In the vast majority of instances, however, online courses are held asynchronously, meaning that while there are due dates each week and expectations for participation, there are no specific times a student or instructor must be logged in to the classroom. The instructor uploads the readings/materials, assignments, and discussion prompts to the learning management system (Blackboard, Canvas, Brightspace, Moodle, etc.), and students work through each weekly module at their own pace, making sure to hit important weekly due dates along the way. The instructor engages in weekly discussion forum conversations as well, facilitating student learning, answering questions, promoting critical thinking, and building the all-important online classroom community. (Most online classrooms follow the asynchronous model because schools market online programs to working adult learners, and the asynchronous environment is more conducive to their lifestyle and eventual success.)

linkedin-sales-solutions-VKJt1EZHlWs-unsplashAs the instructor, you’ll have to be present in the online environment, answer questions, and teach (whatever form that takes – asynchronous discussion or live lecture). Managing the classroom may look a bit different as well. An on-ground instructor can look around and see who is in class and who is not. An online instructor must pay careful attention to student participation in the online classroom, monitor who is turning in assignments and who is missing due dates, and reach out to these at-risk learners before they fall further behind. Online instructors also have access to data on how often their students are logging in to read materials and view assignments.

Despite the distance that comes with “remote learning,” as an online adjunct teacher you will need to develop relationships with students—and as every teacher knows, this is one of the most rewarding parts of teaching. You will need to be available to students and approachable; students will undoubtedly ask questions and are more likely to ask them of an online instructor who seems genuine and willing to help. You will need to meet with students, as requested and appropriate, for conferences, to help with work-in-progress, and so on, though that will probably be coordinated via email, so the online adjunct instructor will need to check their school email daily and reply back to students in a timely fashion. Schools most often stipulate that their online instructors will respond to student communications within 24 hours.

Finally, an online adjunct teacher will need to evaluate and return student work. LMS systems like Blackboard allow students to upload assignments which the instructor later downloads; then, once the work has been evaluated, it can be uploaded by the instructor—with notes and comments—and downloaded by the student, all in the same LMS platform. Tests and quizzes happen within the LMS. Grades are posted in the LMS as well.

The Online Adjunct Teacher Follows a Different Drummer

The online adjunct teacher dances to a whole different tune. You can forget the morning commute, or any commute for that matter. The online college course can be led by the instructor entirely from home. This saves enormous time, of course. And that goes for commuting to a class meeting as well as office hours. Does a student want to meet? Simply log in or place a call at an arranged time.

Online systems for uploading assignments also saves worry. Emails get lost; documents get corrupted. With an LMS system like Blackboard—where due dates can be enforced simply by applying a lock at the specific moment an assignment is finally due—and in this way the online class is efficient, consistent, and fair.

roberto-nickson-GaBDdA63GcQ-unsplashTo put it succinctly, an online adjunct professor is just that: a professor. A teacher. A mentor. A guide, facilitator, and subject matter expert. The only difference is in venue. The flexibility of an online course can benefit both the instructor and the student, especially when the consistency, organization, and community of the online class is nurtured and maintained.

So what an online adjunct teacher must do is be diligent in a way that maintains the enriching online classroom environment. They must be responsive, responsible, and organized to meet their students’ needs. If you can do this, I wager that you’ll find online teaching rewarding.

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

firmbee-com-jrh5lAq-mIs-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 40 Online Adjunct jobs from 26 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

6 Online Teaching Positions – Southern New Hampshire University

4 Online Teaching Positions – Grand Canyon University

4 Volunteer Online Teaching Positions – University of the People

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: American College of Education, Ameritech College, Arizona State University, Aurora University, Central Methodist University, Central Texas College, Chamberlain University College of Nursing, Drexel University, Framingham State University, Herzing University, Life University, Nebraska Wesleyan University, Oklahoma Panhandle State University, Purdue University Global, Rasmussen College, Saybrook University, Simmons University, South University, Texas A&M International University, University of Arizona Global Campus, University of Maryland Global Campus, Upper Iowa University, and Waldorf University.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Last run of OT101 in 2021! Register Today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated over 400 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of
OT101 starts Monday, November 8th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $198, but use coupon code LEARN at check out for 20% off, bringing your price down to $158.40. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($118.80).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

chris-montgomery-smgTvepind4-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 38 Online Adjunct jobs from 28 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

3 Online Teaching/SME Positions – Western Governors University

3 Subject Matter Expert (SME) Positions – Agate Development

2 Online Teaching Positions – Naropa University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: American College of Education, Beal University, Beyond Campus Innovations, California Baptist University, CTU-Online, Franklin University, Grand Canyon University, Houston Baptist University, John Brown University, Johnson & Wales University, Life University, MCPHS, New England College, Northcentral University, Oklahoma Panhandle State University, Purdue University Global, Saybrook University, South University, Southern New Hampshire University, TCSPP, United States University, Unitek Learning, Unity College, University of Saint Katherine, and West Georgia Technical College.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Last run of OT101 in 2021! Register Today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated over 400 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of
OT101 starts Monday, November 8th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $198, but use coupon code LEARN at check out for 20% off, bringing your price down to $158.40. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($118.80).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

 

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under AdjunctWorld Resources.

jon-tyson-hhq1Lxtuwd8-unsplashThe answer to the question, “Can I teach online?” is very likely yes, given that a few parameters are met. That answer should be encouraging. After all, there are jobs available—as of this writing, we have just under 1,000 online adjunct teaching jobs listed in the AdjunctWorld database. We upload close to 50 positions a week, in a wide variety of discipline areas. The follow-up question is, what is required of me in order to teach online?

As far as requirements go, there are general guidelines you can expect in order to teach as an online adjunct. The guidelines vary from school to school, and they can vary by discipline. Luckily, because pretty much everything is online these days, these job requirements are publicly available for your (and our!) industry landscape research.

Let’s take a look at a few colleges for specifics. We’ll examine expectations, job requirements, educational requirements, and more. A look at the requirements of several colleges can help answer your questions.

Learn How to Teach Online

Let’s begin with a look at Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU). They make a generous gesture to the prospective online adjunct teacher: paid training. SNHU offers a 3-week course through the college’s learning management system, Brightspace (a very popular LMS that many school use), to understand how your classroom can “foster a sense of community and collaboration.”

The course is intended to instill in you, the new instructor, faculty expectations, best practices for teaching in an online forum, creating and implementing student-centered learning communities (where 1-on-1 support of students is expected), and the use of SNHU’s academic technologies.

Of course, most colleges will offer at least some form of orientation for new faculty, but it doesn’t hurt to do a bit of research yourself. Look online for best practices, and search through YouTube videos for instructions on using different LMSs. Talk to some online adjuncts and talk to seasoned faculty if you can. You might also consider the online teaching certificate course we offer through AdjunctWorld: Fundamentals of Online Teaching (OT101).

Minimum Qualifications for Teaching Online

vijesh-datt--2f9hjR9Fy0-unsplashYou’re probably thinking, what are the minimum job requirements? This varies by school and discipline area. For example, let’s say you’re a history teacher. SNHU expects, in regard to its undergraduate history classes, a minimum of a master’s degree in the discipline, as well as two years of teaching experience, with online experience being preferred. To teach graduate classes, however, the college expects a doctorate degree.

But in Information Technology, SNHU expects not only a master’s degree but 5+ years’ experience working in IT. For this discipline, teaching experience at the college level is not absolutely required, though it is “strongly preferred.” Depending on the discipline, industry experience of anywhere from 2-5 years is required. If you were applying for an assignment teaching computer science, SNHU expects you to have a background in programs like Java, Linux, and other platforms. Teaching graphic design requires being up-to-date in the use of the Adobe Creative Suite. In a sense, it’s not strictly whether you have taught but simply what you know that counts.

However, in some cases you may need only a bachelor’s degree! In the case of teaching Game Design at SNHU, a BA, BFA, or BS can come from any number of areas: Game Art, 3D Modeling and Animation, Computer Art and/or Design, or just Art, Design, or Computer Science. Knowing Photoshop and other programs, as well as what’s happening in current industry production, is a certain plus.

Let’s look at a different school: the Colorado Community College System. CCCS posts “online instructor” jobs for its thirteen colleges. A sociology online adjunct position requires a master’s degree and “demonstrated competency in use of technology for course delivery.” Fair enough. However, to teach Film/Video Media Audio Post Production (and that’s a mouthful) you need only an associate’s degree! That said, you also need industry experience—specifically, 2,000 hours of it. In both cases, you also need to be a Colorado resident (geographical restrictions like this, while rare, do pop up from time to time).

The Community College of Aurora, which posted the jobs I listed above, also posted a class in HSE Math and Science Instructor. The minimum qualifications here are a bachelor’s degree and at least some experience teaching math and science. The platforms used are Zoom and Google Classroom, among others. Here again, you must also be a Colorado resident.

Much of the variability in online teaching job requirements is due to varying accreditation standards. A school may be nationally (a bit less prestigious) or regionally (the gold standard) accredited. And even among regionally accredited schools (of which there are 7), the standards for faculty credentials vary widely. The Higher Learning Commission (HLC) and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCC) both require faculty to have earned a last a Master’s degree (in any discipline) and at least 18+ graduate semester credit hours in the discipline they are seeking to teach. Some of the other regional accreditors are not this specific, but most require an advanced degree and proven subject matter expertise.

Preferred Qualifications for Teaching Online

oli-dale-xjSkI_seiZY-unsplashYou may find yourself meeting minimum qualifications easily. Most jobs will also post some sort of “preferred” qualifications, so it’s important to take note of those.

Let’s look at SNHU again, specifically at their posting for a history instructor. The minimum qualifications are a master’s degree in history and two years of teaching at the college level. But their preferred qualifications are far more specific: “Course specific qualification including significant graduate work in areas including Islamic Studies and Middle Eastern History.” That additional qualification is timely, obviously, and indicates the degree to which SNHU wants their instructors to be current in their understanding of the world stage. Whether in IT or Middle Eastern culture, you’re probably seeing a pattern here: get up to speed in your area of expertise.

To teach psychology, the minimum requirement is a master’s in psychology, but the preferred requirement is a PhD— “strongly preferred,” in fact. Likewise, having any amount of online teaching experience is the minimum requirement, but having at least two years of online teaching experience is preferred.

Let’s consider another college, Indiana Wesleyan University. They are hiring, at the time of this writing, for an online teaching position in Healthcare Finance. The education required of the online adjunct is a master’s degree in finance or an appropriate field, with an additional 18 graduate credits in finance from a regionally accredited institution; the preferred experience is a terminal degree in Healthcare Administration or Finance. IWU expects a minimum of seven years’ worth of experience in a relevant industry (most likely, as one would expect, the healthcare industry), and though teaching experience is preferred, it is not required.

If a school lists preferences that you do not meet, but you still meet all of the requirements, (and if it doesn’t consume too much of your time to do so and it is a position you are interested in) you should go ahead and apply. You never know who your competition is and what any specific application reviewer is looking for.

Online Teaching: Required Skills

Looking closer at IWU’s healthcare finance teaching job, we find that the college describes what they want the candidate to demonstrate:

  1. Knowledge of online educational delivery tools
  2. Teaching abilities
  3. Higher education experience
  4. Proficiency in using Microsoft products
  5. Knowledge of adult learners

Skills such as these—especially in teaching and using Microsoft Office—are pretty common to teaching jobs, if not jobs in general! But note, too, that the final requirement is very specific and one you will find across a broad swath of jobs: being able to teach adult learners. Why is that?

Because online classes are taken predominantly by adults already firmly entrenched in their careers who are looking to expand their skills, earn a higher degree, get job training, or even change careers. More and more, adult learners are the bread-and-butter of the distance education industry. Although, just as in the on-ground environment, the online learning population is quite varied. As an online instructor, you will also teach traditionally-aged undergraduates and ESL, first generation, or GED students.

The bottom line here is to do your research by institution and accrediting body. While there are some commonalities (advanced degree, experience in the industry, teaching experience, etc.), schools can vary tremendously in their needs and requirements. A lot of their hiring practices depend on their applicant pools; if those pools are small, your application is that much more competitive. The needs of a small, regional college will be different from a large online school that targets the international student market.

It begins in research. Look at regional schools in your area. Then look broader to colleges that are in another state entirely but one from which you can teach. If you find yourself consistently coming up short of the minimum requirements for online adjunct positions in your discipline area, you might consider ways to shore up your position. If you find that you do meet the requirements of most jobs that come across your screen, consider polishing all of your application documents and having them ready-to-go. That way, you can fire off applications as soon as these opportunities present themselves.

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

hope-house-press-leather-diary-studio-PJzc7LOt2Ig-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 43 Online Adjunct jobs from 24 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

 

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

7 Online Teaching Positions – Liberty University

6 Online Teaching Positions – Grand Canyon University

5 Online Teaching Positions – CTU-Online

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: Abraham Lincoln University, AIU Online, Campbell University, Capella University, Columbia University, Franklin University, Johns Hopkins University Center for Government Excellence, Lander University, Limestone University, Maryland University of Integrative Health, Northcentral University, Purdue University Global, Saybrook University, South University, Southern New Hampshire University, Trident University International, University of Maryland Global Campus, University of New England, Waldorf University, Western Governors University, and William & Mary.

 

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Would you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under AdjunctWorld Resources.

jeshoots-com--2vD8lIhdnw-unsplashSo, you found the perfect online teaching job listing and you are about to click to apply when BAM! You see it – the dreaded “online teaching experience preferred” qualifier. You, having no direct online teaching experience, decide this one isn’t for you. But wait! You might think having no direct teaching experience, but that is not necessarily true. You might be surprised what constitutes “experience” in the first place!

Your training, education, and industry experience all count when being considered for a part-time online teaching assignment. Your knowledge of the subject area is one of the most important factors in teaching jobs, as is your career experience, and most forms of virtual training, communication, and comfort with distance learning technologies.

You do not have to consider “online teaching experience” as a strict set of guidelines; rather, focus on the transferrable skills that will help you accomplish the job of teaching online learners. You may, in fact, already have what it takes to manage an online classroom, a curriculum, and an evaluation system that helps your students. Let’s look at those factors.

Colleges Need Online Adjunct Instructors

The first thing to realize about applying for an online adjunct teaching position is that there is a definite need. Whether because of finances, increased student admissions, or just a shortage of adequate faculty and instructors, the fact is that colleges are hiring because they need online instructors. The trend of traditionally on-ground institutions offering online degrees was picking up steam even pre-pandemic and is certainly increasing exponentially post-pandemic. Even a cursory search for online teaching jobs will turn up, well, a lot. Colleges across the country are taking applications for teaching assignments and the Bureau of Labor Statistics only expects this to increase.

You are primed to teach because your experience is most likely already valued!

Training is Teaching!

scott-graham-5fNmWej4tAA-unsplashThink about it: Have you ever taught anybody anything? Then you’ve been a teacher. And this can happen not just with teaching your children to tie their shoes or showing a friend how to make apple cobbler. It can happen on the job, and it frequently does. Utilize that experience.

Look back at your career and consider all of your positions. Where have you needed to teach other people how to do their job? That is bona fide professional teaching experience—any instances of such training should be on your curriculum vita (CV) (the academic’s resume). In undertaking any sort of on-the-job training where you were the trainer, you may have even developed some sort of training materials, and that is essentially the development of a curriculum.

Think, too, that if you had a supervisor who can attest to those skills in the form of a letter of recommendation, you’ve got an ace in your hand.

Soft Skills Matter

The term “soft skills” may seem a bit odd, but soft skills are increasingly relevant across all industries, teaching included. What we think of as “hard skills” are the technical proficiencies we need to undertake a job—how to work a specific computer program like Microsoft Office, or the school’s learning management system—but they are supported by skills that are vitally as important. What are the soft skills associated with online adjunct teaching?

Organization is critically important. The ability to keep yourself and your virtual classroom environment organizes means you can create a curriculum and its accompanying lesson plans. It means you can keep track of grades and organize a schedule where you can meet with students. It means you can create order in a classroom. It – above all – means you are able to be consistently present and available to your online students.

Communication is, naturally, a non-negotiable skill. Especially written, online communication. Online instructors deliver course information, feedback, and assignment instructions virtually  with tact and coherence. In addition to delivering information remotely, you will need to answer questions. You will also have to respond to students in a timely and diplomatic fashion. Teaching is a two-way street where communication is the yellow line in the middle of the road.

Dependability is a soft skill that online students require of you. Are you prepared for each class? Do you return student work in a timely manner? If your students trust you, it is likely because they feel they can depend on you—and the college that ultimately employs you will as well.

There are many more soft skills I can describe—creativity, adaptability, and certainly empathy—and you can probably come up with many more. Find them in your experience and get them into your cover letter with supporting details. They are every bit as important as your knowledge of subject area. You might consider reading our Effective Online Teacher series of blog posts to help you generate more ideas.

Expertise in Your Subject Area

rita-morais-fJLyQ81u80Y-unsplash (1)While being prepared to facilitate a productive online course is important, don’t lose sight of the fact that you are being hired as a subject matter expert. For instance, a school who wants to hire a nursing instructor may want someone who has online teaching experience, but they also want to hire a nurse. An experienced, well-versed one at that.

The same goes for courses in things like law enforcement, business, and information technology. Courses with direct clinical or human service implications or creative outputs – like psychology, social work, or creative writing courses—benefit from being taught by experienced professionals in the field who are also scholars rather than those with a solely academic understanding. An entrepreneur with ten years of successful experience in operating a business, managing finances and employees, and showing a profit is certainly capable of guiding and mentoring others toward those same goals!

Mention Mentoring

Speaking of mentoring, if you have ever directly mentored a colleague, employee, or student emphasize this in your application materials. If you have ever taken anyone under your wing, so to speak, then you have essentially had a student in your life. Mentoring is, of course, an incredibly important part of college teaching—especially online. After all, a student will more than likely come to you, asking for your help and guidance.. The guidance you offer can easily extend beyond just the class itself: You may find yourself coaching a student in college skills, ideas for future study, even postgraduate opportunities.

Students need this mentoring. Show that you can provide it.

Comfort with Technology

This topic may be self-evident—after all, you’re looking to teach an online course—but there is more to being an online adjunct than signing into the online class as you would to a Zoom meeting (and not everyone can do that easily).

Students, and the college departments themselves, expect the appropriate use of technology. The ability to maintain the online class itself via video or asynchronous discussion forum is important, but so is incorporating course materials into the online environment (can the student easily download the curriculum and assignments?), using dynamic, interactive slide presentations, and teaching students how to use online resources for research, whether that be the Internet or library databases.

In job postings, schools will often list experience with their learning management system (LMS) as either preferred or required. For example, Purdue University Global prefers experience with their LMS, Brightspace. Schools that host their online courses on Blackboard or Canvas will prefer or require experience – or at least familiarity – with these platforms. If you were a student at a school that used these platforms, this counts as “familiarity.” If you’ve taught on-ground and used an LMS to give exams or post grades, then you also have some familiarity with LMSs and should list this skill in your CV and highlight them in your cover letter.

Many LMSs offer free trainings (i.e. Moodle) and you can source your own free training on other LMSs via YouTube or other web resources. If you are currently an online student or an on-ground instructor at an institution, you likely have access to some sort of free LMS training. In short, comfort with an LMS is something you can acquire on your own, outside of having directly taught for a school that uses those technologies.

Write Your Cover Letter and Craft Your CV (Resume)

joao-ferrao-4YzrcDNcRVg-unsplash (1)Taking all the above information, all of which comes from your experience, what you will need to do is to get this “relevant job experience” into a well-thought-out cover letter and a to-the-point CV. You can write these regardless of whether you have been in a profession for decades or are just graduating a master’s program. Remember: there is an increasing need to fill online teaching vacancies, and there is no reason you cannot demonstrate to prospective employers at a university that you are an excellent candidate with the transferrable skills needed to do the job well. Detail your job experience and the soft skills associated with it. Include any relevant experience in training. Demonstrate your technological prowess.

The bottom line here is that the idea of having “no experience” is misleading; more than likely, you have plenty of experience. You need only identify and demonstrate it.

We at AdjunctWorld offer services that will help you craft a strong curriculum vita (CV/resume) and cover letter. Read more about our OnRamp course or contact us for more information.

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

windows-KXIWqtmvfxg-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member!

This week we posted 55 Online Adjunct jobs from 19 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

16 Online Teaching Positions – Rasmussen College

7 Volunteer Online Teaching Positions – University of the People

7 Online Teaching Positions – Western Governors University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: AIU Online, CTU-Online, Daemen College, Franklin University, Grand Canyon University, IBMC College, Johns Hopkins University Center for Government Excellence, Liberty University, Northwestern Health Sciences University, Purdue University Global, Southern New Hampshire University, Strayer University, The Art of Education University, University of Maryland Global Campus, University of Southern California, and William & Mary.

 

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!