Posted by & filed under AdjunctWorld Resources.

green-chameleon-s9CC2SKySJM-unsplash (1)When you are applying for an online teaching job with a college, what you will need to submit may vary somewhat, but there are some standard things to include. You can assume that all colleges will ask for a curriculum vitae, your “CV,” or maybe in some cases a simpler resume. Some will ask for your college transcripts or letters of recommendation. Some, though not all, will ask for a cover letter. Even if they don’t specifically ask for a cover letter, it is important to craft one—I think you’ll find you’ll be using it often enough!

Writing a cover letter for an online adjunct teaching job will follow the same principles as any cover letter, but you will need to address what matters for online adjunct positions: your teaching experience, your understanding and use of technology, your experience with students in online environments, and the soft skills that you’ve picked up along the way. This is also a good forum to demonstrate your enthusiasm for the role—if not your outright excitement!

Even if you’ve written a cover letter for a standard teaching role—that is, a teaching position in a physical classroom setting—you’ll need to fine tune it to convince the HR personnel that you are a good fit for teaching online, which is far different.

Cover Letters: The Basics

You probably know by now some of the most basic elements of a cover letter—naturally, you want to include all of your contact information, though nowadays that can include a LinkedIn profile. Like any cover letter, do your best to personalize the letter to the person doing the hiring. With online adjunct applications, that may be someone in the college’s HR department or, as is often the case, the head of the department you are applying for. It maybe even another professor who has taken on the responsibility.

Let me offer a brief refresher course on the cover letter.

After the salutation, introduce your cover letter by showing off skills, experience, and achievements. “As a teacher with six years of experience…” is a good way to start, for example. You can also indicate your teaching history: “I began my career as a high school teacher in Wisconsin, and then I…”

More particularly, use the description in the posting—the job duties and responsibilities, as well as the required qualifications—as a template for the body of your cover letter. For example, Richland Community College in Illinois is hiring for an online astronomy adjunct instructor, though they do not have a lot of detail in their posting. The posting does say that they require a master’s degree in astronomy or a master’s in a related field with at least 18 graduate hours of astronomy or physics. You could address the point like this: “After I earned my master’s in Astronomy from X College, I went on to…” and so on.

jeshoots-com-pUAM5hPaCRI-unsplashStaying in Illinois, let’s look at a more detailed posting, that of a job teaching engineering online at Joliet Junior College. Under the section “essential job duties and key responsibilities” is a list of points to address: “Comply with departmental curriculum, grading standards, attendance policies, textbook choices, and assessments.” Also, “effectively communicate with appropriate staff and chair.” The idea here is to address these points to make clear that you follow procedures, communicate with colleagues, and maintain a structure for your class. How you do it is what gets discussed in your letter, but generally—touch on the points enough to stir interest.

As always, close your cover letter in a professional fashion, and don’t be shy about expressing your enthusiasm.

What to Include in Your Cover Letter for “Online Teaching”

There are several key points to include in the body of your cover letter that are specific to teaching in an online environment. Let’s look at a description for a job with Morton College, teaching business, marketing, and supply chain management in an online environment.

First, they post some preferred qualifications: “Business expertise in areas such as social media and business, mobile business applications, e-commerce, computer/technology and business, logistics/supply chain, international business, or entrepreneurship/business management.” Well, that’s a lot. But if you can match these qualifications, the letter is just the place to prove you can do it—but again, only enough to stir interest so that the HR personnel and the business department faculty want to talk to you to get more details.

Remember, with many online adjunct positions, the bulk of your class may well be adults either changing careers or looking to get certifications and promotions in their current careers—and your class is their ticket. Your real-world experience—no matter what you teach, really—is paramount!

Now, the “specific job duties” are of particular interest here, and I say that because what this college explicitly asks for can be used for ANY cover letter for ANY college. Here’s a few salient points that Morton College asks for:

  • Ability to evaluate, design, and implement curriculum, testing, and/or teaching methodologies.
  • Ability to work effectively with diverse populations.
  • Ability to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing.
  • Knowledge of teaching methods, curriculum, and education programs.
  • Teaching and facilitation skills.
  • Ability to teach and control the behavior of students.
  • Knowledge of academic and/or vocational education curricula.
  • Knowledge of and ability to apply relevant current education methodologies and techniques.
  • Ability to gather data, compiles information, and prepares reports

That’s a lot to cover, but these duties are also what are most important, and they are duties that the department who may prospectively hire you wants to know you can accomplish. Answer to these points with your experience; the more you can give authentic details that demonstrate you have done these things—and can again, and again—the more you’ll sell yourself. Let’s look closer.

samantha-borges-q3zZHY5GHu0-unsplashShowing the “ability to evaluate, design, and implement curriculum, testing, and/or teaching methodologies” shows that you can get the basic job done on your own. You can be responsible for designing the class, based on the college’s expectations and curriculum, and that you can do so with a methodology that you have tested by experience. Offer a few outtakes from your curriculum; summarize your methodology.

The “ability to work effectively with diverse populations” is incredibly important for online classes where, as we’ve seen, diversity is the norm. For one, ages can range widely, from typical college-age students to retirees. You’ll need to address populations varying in gender, race, and income level. How you design your class to meet all those needs will be of special interest to hiring committees. Give examples of the populations you’ve worked with.

Here are two that you can shape into demonstrating your effectiveness in online teaching: “Knowledge of teaching methods, curriculum, and education programs” and “Teaching and facilitation skills.” In an online environment, the faculty wants to know if they can trust you to facilitate an effective class. Again, be detailed, just enough to make them want to meet you in person. How do you facilitate an online discussion, and how do you know it works with students? Put it in your letter.

Specific Points to Include

When you’re writing about your experience with technology, be specific. If you’ve used a learning management system, an LMS, which one did you use? Blackboard? Canvas or Moodle? Let them know regardless that you have—and it doesn’t matter necessarily if you’ve used it for a college, a business, or with a class you designed and led yourself. If you haven’t, let them know that you’ve trained yourself with using one of more systems.

Show how you’ve incorporated technology into your online environment. What programs have you used? PowerPoint? Google Classroom? If you’ve set up discussion boards, say so in your letter. If you’ve used video modules, tell which ones and explain how they were successfully integrated into the online environment. You may even have a certification like “Google Certified Educator”—list them. Whatever shows that you are knowledgeable in online teaching is invaluable!

You can probably go so far as to summarize how you’ve led discussions online, the importance of your email availability, and more. Try to put the reader in your classroom—just enough so they’ll want to talk to you more about your experience!

Include a Brief Teaching Statement

What kind of teacher are you? What kind of growth do you want to see in your students? What is it students take from your class? And, importantly, what kinds of “soft skills” do you exemplify in your online classes? Flexibility? Communication? Being supportive? Devote a paragraph to this.

Vanderbilt University (n.d.) offers a fine definition of a teaching statement: “a purposeful and reflective essay about the author’s teaching beliefs and practices. It is an individual narrative that includes not only one’s beliefs about the teaching and learning process, but also concrete examples of the ways in which he or she enacts these beliefs in the classroom” (para. 1).

Tell how you think learning occurs. Describe how your teaching facilitates student learning. Explain why you teach the way you do. Show what constitutes evidence of learning. Detail the goals you have for students and for yourself. Show how you create an inclusive learning environment. Describe your interests in different techniques and activities you use. In the case of a cover letter (unless a college asks for a full “teaching statement”), try to keep this brief but concrete.

neonbrand-1-aA2Fadydc-unsplashWhen you devote space in your letter to “soft skills,” especially as they relate to your teaching skills, frame them in your actual accomplishments. When were you compassionate, for example? What program were you implementing, what class were you teaching, what club were you facilitating? A few brief sentences are enough to convey that, above all else, you care about student success, and you strive to create relationships with them.

Do this all within a space of about one page, single-spaced, no more. Be concise with your language and grammar. Remember, too, that the main thing the college wants to know is what kind of teacher you are in an online environment, working with diverse students and motivating them throughout the course. Use your best writing and have someone edit it, for sure. Your confidence will show.

The Basic Template

Here’s a prescription for how to introduce yourself:

  1. Detail your experience, but don’t just parrot your resume.
  2. Point out your achievements, using concrete examples of your successes.
  3. Detail certifications or special trainings and remember that some colleges offer training for teaching online—if you’ve done that, it counts.
  4. All work outside the classroom is relevant, too, especially if you’re teaching in programs like nursing, business, or social work, to name a few.

You can see that this is a basic prescription for a CV, and all you need do is tune it specifically to your skills in teaching and, especially, teaching online. With your tailored CV in hand, emphasizing your experience as a teacher and online afficionado, you will undoubtedly find yourself at “the top of the pile,” so to speak.

Circulate this CV widely and cast your net as far as you can.

OnRamp: How We Can Help

simon-berger-t6zocP52Fg0-unsplashIn our 4-week course titled OnRamp: a Practical Guide to Landing an Online Teaching Job, we devote an entire week to workshopping both your CV and your Cover Letter and at the end of the course you will have a fully and professionally edited set of application materials ready-to-go so that you can confidently apply to on line teaching positions. Please see our OnRamp Course Description and FAQ page for more information on OnRamp course goals, pricing, and start dates.

 

References:

Center for Teaching, Vanderbilt University (n.d.) Teaching Statements. https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/teaching-statements/

 

Posted by & filed under AdjunctWorld Resources.

ryan-gagnon--pGEFxRYY3E-unsplashSocial work degrees, whether undergraduate or postgraduate, are popular degrees, and they’re also commonly degrees a student can earn online, whether undergraduate or graduate. That being the case, you can teach social work online as an adjunct professor—because there is a definite need for teachers.

There are many places to teach social work to students in online college programs. Social workers can teach online as a supplementary job, or even as a career. You will typically need to meet some degree and certification requirements, and having some experience teaching will be helpful, as well—though that is not always expected. Because social work programs don’t house what we might think of as traditional “academics,” that leaves the door wide open for experienced professionals to fill teaching positions.

If you’re beginning to consider teaching online, you probably have questions. Where can I teach? What are those requirements, and what will I need to submit with an application? We’ll look at all these questions here.

Can You Teach Social Work Online?

There is a blog online, Teaching & Learning in Social Work, and in this post, the Chair of the Department of Social Work at Western Kentucky University, Patricia Desrosiers (2019), writes about adjuncting in the world of social work. She quotes a statistic from the Council on Social Work Education that says over half of all the social workers in this country are adjunct instructors. Over half!

One reason is that “part-time instructors bring their practice experience into the classroom, making book content come alive for students.” But strong part-time instructors, Desrosiers laments, are hard to find. Your goal: become that strong part-time instructor. And there will be plenty of students: the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says that social work employment is expected to grow 16% between 2016 and 2026.

Why become an online adjunct in social work? For one, Derosiers says, teaching is fun—and you’ll have access to resources to improve your own practice and career, as well. You’ll also be adding to the profession, “giving back,” as it were. You’ll not only teach students, you may actively help them by identifying students for field placements and employment.

phillip-goldsberry--AHIA8Bs_HA-unsplashDerosiers points out two things you will need: qualification and time. She points to accreditation standards of the CSWE, which stipulates not only a Master’s in Social Work but a minimum of two years post-MSW experience in order to teach. You’ll need to budget time, as well: a three-credit hour course, she says, can take up six to nine hours weekly of time for prep, and that doesn’t factor in grading.

Again, you do not have to be an academic to secure a teaching job in social work—it seems apparent that the professional experience can account for far more than strictly teaching. As a social worker yourself, you could teach on the side or make a big career change and stick with teaching online. Let’s look at what you might need to make either change.

What Do You Need to Be an Online Social Work Professor?

Teaching social work is no different from any other teaching. Some of the basic requirements you’ll need to meet are largely the same.

The first thing you’ll need, of course, is a college degree from an accredited institution. According to The New Social Worker online magazine, CSWE accreditation standards establish a preference for a Ph.D. This will not always be the case when you start researching jobs, though.

George Fox University in Oregon, for example, prefers a master’s degree—and previous teaching experience is desirable, but not required. Liberty University, too, makes having an MSW a minimum qualification. Same with New Mexico Highland University, a college that may require social work licensure, depending on the course taught.

A teaching job posted at the University of Utah (an online assistant professor, and so full-time) asks for at least an MSW, though a Ph.D. or Doctor of Social Work degree is preferred. That job, however, even though it’s full-time, can give you a sense of where a career may continue—that is, where a part-timer can eventually attain to! Central State University, which urgently needs adjuncts for social work, among other disciplines, says that it welcomes adjuncts interested in becoming full-time, non-tenure track faculty in the future.

alexander-pemberton-skLqGtLrYKc-unsplashEven if you’ve only attained your master’s degree, you can teach.

Outside of that, it may—or may not—be important to have some teaching experience. Remember, though, that social workers are different from, say, philosophers. A philosophy major could earn a master’s or a Ph.D. and go straight into academia, teaching—unless they get a job outside academia and write essays on their free time! But a social worker is likely going to go straight into working, whether in the public sector (schools, state jobs) or nonprofits. Some can turn, after even a few years in the field, to teaching, but many don’t necessarily consider that move.

As I’ve written before, “teaching” can mean many things. Any sort of conference where you’ve given a talk or a workshop is teaching. Training fellow employees is teaching. All of it should be kept on a CV.

How Do You Become an Online Social Work Professor?

Once you’ve decided on being an online adjunct of social work, you need only plot the course. You’ll need to assemble your materials, all of which, thankfully, can be uploaded directly to a college’s job site.

  1. You’ll need your graduate degree (or degrees), but you’ll often need to send your college transcripts, as well. Most likely that will only need to be postgraduate transcripts.
  1. You will need some form of letter of application—a cover letter. In that letter, detail your academic experience (if any) as a teacher, especially online. If you have taught online, you probably used a learning management system (an LMS); which one? You may be asked to provide a teaching philosophy (in some cases, a college may ask for a separate document containing that philosophy), but if not, you can add a brief account of your philosophy in the cover letter.
  1. You will need your curriculum vita—your CV. Detail your education, of course, where you graduated from and when. List your job experience—remember that professional experience in social work is desirable! Include any teaching experience, online or traditional. Leading trainings with your colleagues counts as teaching.
  1. Colleges may ask for professional references with contact information. Others may ask for three current letters of recommendation. Whether professors, supervisors, or colleagues, always keep those references handy—and if you’ve worked in the field, you most likely have them.

It should be noted that it is not uncommon these days for colleges to maintain a “pool” of applicants rather than specifically hiring for a single, specific role. If that’s the case, colleges will draw from that pool according to need—how many courses they actually have available to teach. College’s job postings on their websites will make this clear.

Adjunct Social Work Professor Jobs are Online

Since my search engine knows I’m in Kentucky, when I go looking for online social work programs, it doesn’t let me down—and in fact, I realized that there are a lot of online programs right here in Kentucky.

esther-tuttle-MnRXX76faXM-unsplashThe University of Louisville has an online Doctor of Social Work program—100% of the fourteen courses it offers are online. Eastern Kentucky University likewise offers a 100% online program, their MSW. Campbellsville University offers a BSW and an MSW. Brescia University has a program. The University of Kentucky has a program. Even Maryville University in nearby St. Louis, listed as one of Forbes “Top Colleges,” hosts a BSW, and the University of Cincinnati has a program, and Indiana Wesleyan has a program, all of them neighboring Kentucky. And that’s only one state! That’s a lot of options—and of course, they’re all online. (If you lived in Louisville, you wouldn’t necessarily have to drive two hours to Cincinnati to teach!)

With social work a growing field, and the proliferation of online BSW, MSW, and DSW programs, there is an increasing need for teachers of social work. Whether you’ve been strictly in the profession or have taught previously, there is undoubtedly a need for your skills.

Adjunct World lists job postings daily, and you can utilize this resource to find a teaching position in social work that works for you.

 

References

Desrosiers, P. (2019). Becoming an awesome adjunct professor in social work [Blog Post].
https://laureliversonhitchcock.org/2019/04/23/becoming-an-awesome-adjunct-professor-in-social-work/

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

julia-joppien--3wygakaeQc-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member! In addition to online teaching job alerts, you will also receive big discounts on our professional development courses – like our online teaching certificate course (OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching) as well as OnRamp: A Practical Guide to Landing an Online Teaching Job.

This week we posted 57 Online Adjunct jobs from 20 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

15 Online Teaching Positions – Bryant & Stratton College

7 Online Teaching Positions (1 listing, 7 disciplines) – Thomas Jefferson University

7 Online Teaching Positions – University of Maryland Global Campus

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: American Public University System, Capella University, Felbry College, Galen College of Nursing, Grand Canyon University, Liberty University, Rasmussen College, Regis University, Saint Leo University, South University, Southern New Hampshire University, Unity College, University of Arizona Global Campus, University of Phoenix, Upper Iowa University, Walden University, and Western Governors University.

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated nearly 450 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of OT101 starts Monday, March 14, 2022. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under AdjunctWorld Resources.

linkedin-sales-solutions-1LyBcHrH4J8-unsplashWhen looking for online adjunct teaching positions, your first question may well be, “But what can I teach?” Are there particular courses that are more likely to be online than others? Can any course be taught online? Is your particular discipline one in which you’ll find online classes to teach?

There is a huge array of classes that can be taught online. Because colleges are moving more and more toward increasing online classes, it is very likely that you will find classes to teach in just about any subject. Those subjects range through the sciences, humanities, social sciences, arts, and mathematics—the subjects typical to college coursework—and they also range through specific work-related courses like nursing, accounting, computer science, and more.

The courses offered by colleges can still vary tremendously across your region, your state, and the country. Different colleges have very different programs, and those will also dictate what courses are available to teach online. What can you expect to find? A lot.

Teaching English and Composition

One of the ever-present adjunct instructor jobs is in composition—it is a basic course, required of pretty much all college students, and so there are a lot of sections offered. But are any offered online? As a matter of fact, they are.

Northwestern Health Sciences University, for example, offers a fully online English Composition course. This is a “part-time” position, seven hours a week, and though a master’s degree is required to teach it, you don’t need any experience. To teach at the undergraduate level, the job positing clearly says, “0-2 years of experience.” Further, having experience teaching online is “preferred” but not required.

Purdue University Global also offers composition courses in asynchronous format. You’d be required to offer virtual office hours, respond to electronic correspondence in a timely fashion, and lead message board discussions. The class utilizes Adobe Connect, Microsoft Office Suite, and Brightspace education software—so experience with these programs, as well as three years of online teaching experience, is preferred, though three years of teaching online is a minimum qualification.

The Los Angeles Community College District offers some of their composition courses online using Canvas. Ohio’s Columbus State Community College offers English, and specifically developmental reading and writing, for more than $50 an hour, and some of those courses are online. Central State University, also in Ohio, offers online course in English Composition—and in fact, as far as humanities goes, they offer more than that.

Teaching the Humanities

Despite the abundance of English Composition adjunct positions available, as well as the ease you might imagine such a course could be taught entirely online, there are actually a lot of humanities classes offered online.

greg-rosenke-3ULMRQZ5APA-unsplashAside from composition, Central State University offers a number of humanities courses online, including Spanish language, French literature, history, journalism and mass communication, and philosophy & religion. It is not uncommon to find courses like these at other colleges available, as well.

Just basic “humanities” as a course is offered for online adjuncts by Baton Rouge Community College in Louisiana and Indian River State College in Florida. Excelsior College in Albany, New York offers a humanities course—they want someone who specializes in Ethics—that will be offered entirely in Spanish! So if you speak a second language, there are opportunities to use that skill, as well.

Sciences and Mathematics

The demand for workers skilled in math and sciences has been growing for decades—the economy has come to depend on STEM students, and that is a trend showing no signs of stopping. So you can expect there to be plenty of jobs teaching math and science online—and you’d be right to think so.

Finger Lakes Community college in upstate New York hires, at $945 per contract hour, for mathematics positions where having online teaching experience is a plus. Same with West Virginia Northern Community college, who hired for both on-campus and online classes.

The sciences, too, are moving to an online format. The California Baptist University hires adjuncts for an online course in research methods and statistics. Biology is a popular subject, with Los Angeles Pacific University offering more than $30 an hour to teach biology online—and in lieu of actual online teaching experience, they accept the completion of an online teaching certification process (granted, they are only authorized to hire in nineteen states, but that is still quite a range).

Common sciences where you will find jobs for online courses include physics, psychology, astronomy—even fire science! (Fire science is taught online by colleges like Arizona’s Mohave Community College, and Washington’s Everett Community College and Skagit Valley College).

Many of the courses I’ve detailed so far largely fall under the umbrella of undergraduate courses, and they are often courses required of all students—like composition or mathematics. It’s often the case, though, that one can teach upper-division undergraduate courses and even graduate courses—psychology is a prime example. But other courses are far more specific to particular industries, and if you have degrees and/or experience in those industries, a whole new level of opportunity opens up.

Professional Courses

There is an increasing number of adults wanting to take college coursework to further their career—and many of these courses are online. That’s no surprise, given that the typical adult—who probably already has a career, a family, and other responsibilities—can’t fit college classes into their day. what used to be “night school” is now largely handled online.

Penn State offers a number of such courses. Supply chain management, graphic design for communications, marketing, management, and computer science are all offered as online courses for adjuncts to apply for.

claire-anderson-Vq__yk6faOI-unsplashCentral State, prior to the Summer 2020 semester, was in urgent need of online adjuncts in criminal justice, business management, and early childhood education. Beginning in the fall of 2020, they planned to offer their intervention specialist (INS) program online, as well. Professional coursework is growing, and help is clearly needed.

I’ve written elsewhere about the need for adjuncts to teach things like nursing and accounting. Even radiology technology is taught online. Teaching classes like these will allow you to interact with what we might think of as more traditional undergraduate students and adults who are already professionals in their field.

So what courses can you teach online? A lot, it turns out. Many job boards post far more than I can account for here. Start searching our AdjunctWorld online teaching job database and see what turns up.

 

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

jo-szczepanska-5aiRb5f464A-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member! In addition to online teaching job alerts, you will also receive big discounts on our professional development courses – like our online teaching certificate course (OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching) as well as OnRamp: A Practical Guide to Landing an Online Teaching Job.

This week we posted 39 Online Adjunct jobs from 23 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

6 Online Teaching Positions – Liberty University

5 Online Teaching Positions – Capella University

5 Online Teaching Positions – University of Maryland Global Campus

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: Adler University, AIU Online, Bryant & Stratton College, Calbright College, Columbia University, CTU-Online, Eastern Oregon University, Florida Technical College, Franklin University, Grand Canyon University, Herzing University, Leighton University, Lindsey Wilson College, Saybrook University, Southern New Hampshire University, Syracuse University, Texas A&M International University, University of Arizona Global Campus, University of the Cumberlands, and Western Governors University.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated over 400 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of
OT101 starts Monday, January 17th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

REGISTER FOR OT101 HERE

Premium Membership

premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

windows-SwHvzwEzCfA-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member! In addition to online teaching job alerts, you will also receive big discounts on our professional development courses – like our online teaching certificate course (OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching) as well as OnRamp: A Practical Guide to Landing an Online Teaching Job.

This week we posted 41 Online Adjunct jobs from 22 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

5 Online Teaching Positions (1 listing, 5 disciplines) – National Louis University

5 Online Teaching Positions – Grand Canyon University

4 Online Teaching Positions – Southern New Hampshire University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: Abilene Christian University, Bay State College, Capella University, CSU Global, CTU-Online, Herzing University, Kaplan, Kentucky College of Art and Design, Inc., Linfield University, Maryville University, Northcentral University, San Ignacio University, San Joaquin Valley College, South College of Tennessee, Strayer University, University of Arizona Global Campus, University of Maryland Global Campus, University Of Washington, and Western Governors University.

 

Online Teaching Certificate Course

OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching

Space is limited! Register today!

samantha-borges-EeS69TTPQ18-unsplashOT101 is our 4-week, asynchronous, instructor-led certificate course that provides training in today’s best practices in distance education. Upon successful completion of OT101, you will receive a certificate to document your achievement which can be highlighted in your job applications and CV.

To date, we’ve graduated over 400 members of our community (read testimonials here). The next run of
OT101 starts Monday, January 17th. Enrollment is now open, space is limited.

OT101 normally costs $249, but use coupon code SAVE30 at check out for 30% off, bringing your price down to $174.30. Premium members will notice an additional 25% off taken at check out ($129.48).

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Posted by & filed under Online Teaching Resources.

miguel-henriques--8atMWER8bI-unsplash (1)When it comes to online student success, student engagement is going to naturally rank high. This is especially the case in online courses, where student behavior, motivation, and participation are critical. Trying to “stay connected” in an online class—even though the Internet is supposedly about connection—can prove daunting to many students. After all, it is quite easy to get lost in the crowd. It’s up to you, as the instructor, to keep that from happening. Imagine if the class is large; a big seminar, say, with possibly even hundreds of students!

There are numerous ways to engage students in those big online classes. Make content challenging. Make activities relevant. Make class time interactive. And make yourself engaging, too. These factors have all been backed up by good research.

That all sounds great, doesn’t it—but what can you actually do to make that happen? We’ll break down these methods more concretely and look at a few activities you can incorporate into your online class.

What Student Reviews Show – What Works in the Large Online Classroom

It’s all well and good for educators like you to put your heads together and try to figure out how to make the online class—and big ones at that—more engaging. But what do students think? That’s where the gold lies, the deep insight. If you want to know how well a class went, the student is the one to ask—and colleges know this. And now students routinely fill out class evaluations at the end of the semester, and those evaluations give us some important information.

Khe Foon Hew (2018), a professor at the University of Hong Kong, undertook a study of what are called “massive open online courses” (MOOCs; think “Udemy” or “MasterClass” and platforms like that) to find out what encouraged—and discouraged—student engagement. To do so, he got his feedback directly from the students themselves through evaluations.

john-schnobrich-FlPc9_VocJ4-unsplashHew’s sample for this study consisted of nearly 4,500 students in a variety of subjects, including healthcare, psychology, entrepreneurship, and history, all of them MOOCs. As Hew points out, some of these MOOCs can be upwards of 40,000 students! Now, at a typical college you will not be teaching that many students—not at once, anyway (I’d consider any online course that hits the 50+ student mark as ‘large’)—but some of Hew’s findings are indisputably valuable.

What’s important here is that MOOCs can vary in quality, at least as far as student ratings go. Students rate some things as positive for sure, but other things they declare as decidedly negative. Why, Hew asks, might some classes be higher rated than others?

In a pilot study, he found three basic components to student success in terms of their engagement with the course.

  1. Giving students flexibility in choosing resources –and allowing them to use those resources in their own time and at their own pace—creates a sense of autonomy. Whatever the resources, whether video or forum or readings, as well as the various activities and challenges, let students have a choice.
  2. Interaction with peers, of course, is important. The interaction that happens when they ask questions or give answers (so this includes interaction with the instructor as well) gives students a sense of connection.
  3. What gives students a sense of competency is the use of problem-centered learning. Students gain a better understanding of topics through things like active learning, peer interaction, and using readings to help solve real-life problems.

So: flexibility, interactivity, and competency—our core components. Hew’s initial pilot was a small study, and when he turned his attention to the larger study, he used student comments as the basis for a list of “what works.” The four most commonly mentioned factors, according to students, were these:

  1. Problem-centric learning, where activities are clearly related to real-life situations. This allows students to make meaning, which is in itself motivating and enriching.
  2. Active learning with feedback, which engages the student by requiring that they take on tasks and think about what they’re doing and how they’re doing it. The feedback is equally important—and it will be easier for you to give individual students feedback in a college class rather than a large-scale MOOC, but you still can use things like peer review for writing assignments, which engages students at another level and empowers them to do evaluative work.
  3. Cater the course to student needs and preferences, and at least one way to achieve this is by not making course materials and assignments too difficult to understand and do, but at the same time, making them challenging enough that the student is not bored. For students who are interested in pursuing a subject further, provide more resources for them—videos, readings, you name it. Remember, these are adults: they know what they want!
  4. Finally, a little humor and enthusiasm on the teacher’s part goes a long way. But isn’t that always the case? All you need to do is think back on your favorite teachers. And that humor and enthusiasm works especially well—it is in fact just about requisite—in an online class, where distance can affect a sense of connection.

Peer responsiveness and instructor availability were also found to be important. Overall, the ways to approach large classes are clear: be engaging; offer a wide variety of resources for students to use and the choices that go along with them; keep students active and working together; and above all, make challenges that are relevant to the students’ lives.

Peer and Self-Assessment in the Large Online Classroom

Kulkarni et al. (2013) out of Stanford University also focused on MOOC’s—specifically in connection with assessment. One of the most important motivators for students in any class is feedback. Feedback engages students in self-reflection. As the researchers point out, feedback from an instructor in large classes simply can’t scale—there’s too many students to give each the individual attention. With peer feedback, though, the student is now in the position of the assessor, which gives them a new level of experience and empowerment—and by seeing the work of another student, they can begin to think from a new perspective.

“Peer assessment can increase student involvement and maturity,” the researchers write. It can also “enhance classroom discussion,” as you might expect. All of this engages the student, gets them interested, and gives them a real-world challenge in assessing their peers. Naturally, it also creates relationships.

brooke-cagle--uHVRvDr7pg-unsplashThe trick is, though, to prevent them from assessing off mark and, essentially, inflating the grades, however unwittingly. The researchers point to the need to have clear, unambiguous rubrics to guide peer assessments, and to teach the students to use them. And of course, having the instructor model assessment techniques helps bring student evaluations—including of their own work—more in line with instructor evaluations. The margin of error decreases.

How can you do this? Start with what we might call calibration. Students grade a submission but also see how the instructor grades the same submission, which is provided to them with an explanation. If the two evaluations, teacher and student, are not aligned, the student continues to practice up to five times. Once they get it, or once they have done five assessments (regardless of whether they are close to the teacher’s evaluation or not) they continue on to the assessment phase.

The researchers did this in their experiment, and by the second iteration, nearly 43% of the student evaluations were within 5% of the instructor’s, and over 65% were within 10%. As they point out, this can take an enormous amount of work off the instructor’s plate—and empower students instead.

How did students react? Positively. A full 42% of the students found value in seeing other student work, and 31% said they learned how to communicate their ideas. They could see other perspectives and even get inspiration from seeing peer work.

It’s clear that engagement—and by now we know that adult learners want a definitive role in their education—can come from giving the student responsibilities that matter, and that have real-world implications. The hard skills may be learning to evaluate specific work concisely, but the so-called “soft skill” of communication certainly is at play. And, of course, as the instructor you get the added benefit of creating an interactive environment. Students get to know one another—and not just one another, but one another’s actual work.

Break ‘Em Up – Using Small Group Discussions in the Large Online Class

Class too big? Make it smaller—here’s how.

A study by Elison-Bowers et al. (2011) from Boise State University found a number of ways to make the class more engaging—not to mention manageable—and one of the best ideas is to break the class up into smaller groups.

But first, have students get to know each other. Whether synchronously, in real time, or via a discussion board, students can introduce themselves and tell a bit about themselves—what they are studying, their interests and hobbies, and so on. Make this a graded requirement! If you as the teacher take but a moment to respond, however simply, to each student, that will go far in keeping them engaged. And as students get to know each other, this is going to plant the seeds for collaboration later. It’s important, they point out, to make an activity like this not only a requirement but directly related to the course—anything that reeks of “busy work” only serves to turn a student off.

small-group-network-hRScHZGXkTA-unsplash (2)Now, it is doubtful that you will have the luck of securing teaching assistants to take on these small groups—a TA, I mean—but you could still break the large group into smaller groups. Though the authors of the study use a class of 150 as an example, you could easily do this with a group of 24, where you could break it up into groups of 8 students. Without a TA, why not designate one of the students a “leader,” and have them switch up that role periodically throughout the course? The student leader can facilitate discussions, for example. And with peer evaluation, you can see how the students can become their own “TA.”

“As online education evolves,” the authors conclude, “instructors must be prepared to teach not only the very large online classes of today but those of the future.” They wrote this in 2011—a decade ago! This is the future they envisioned, and they were correct in their prophecies.

Some online classes will grow larger, and online classes in general will proliferate for the foreseeable future. So how can you be prepared to engage students in these large online classes? The big ideas that the research suggests is giving students responsibilities, getting them social, and getting them active in their own evaluation. And those are only a few ideas. There are plenty of directions for you to do research yourself, and now is the time, as you’re cultivating your own online adjunct teaching career, to be the student yourself.

 

References:

Hew, K.F. (2018). Unpacking the strategies of ten highly rated MOOCs: Implications for engaging students in large online courses. Teachers College Record, 120(1), 1-40. https://www.tcrecord.org/Content.asp?ContentId=22013

Kulkarni, C., Wei, K., Le, H., Chia, D., Papadopoulos, K., Cheng, J., Koller, D., & Klemmer, S. Peer and self assessment in massive online classes. Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 20(6), Article 33. https://dl.acm.org/doi/pdf/10.1145/2505057

Elison-Bowers, P., Sand, J., Barlow, M.R., & Wing, T. (2011). Strategies for managing large online classes. The International Journal of Learning, 18(2), 57-66. https://scholarworks.boisestate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1151&context=psych_facpubs

Posted by & filed under Job Listings.

kari-shea-apcUIqOPEIo-unsplashEach week we will summarize all the online adjunct jobs we’ve added to AdjunctWorld during the week for easy reference.

If you’d like to be notified right after we post a new online teaching job in your discipline area, giving your application a jump start, consider becoming a Premium Member! In addition to online teaching job alerts, you will also receive big discounts on our professional development courses – like our online teaching certificate course (OT101: Fundamentals of Online Teaching) as well as OnRamp: A Practical Guide to Landing an Online Teaching Job.

This week we posted 31 Online Adjunct jobs from 10 schools.

We at AdjunctWorld wish you the best of luck in your job search. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to email Brooke for more information.

This Week’s Online Teaching Job Summary

7 Online Teaching Positions – Houston Baptist University

6 Online Teaching Positions (1 listing, 6 disciplines) – Southern New Hampshire University

5 Online Teaching Positions – Western Governors University

…as well as online teaching opportunities at: Capella University, Contemporary Technology University, Liberty University, Provo College, University of Kentucky, University of Maryland Global Campus, and University of the People.

 

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premium buttonWould you like to be alerted to the jobs in your discipline(s) right after they are posted on AdjunctWorld, rather than waiting for this weekly summary? Over the past week we’ve sent out hundreds of daily job alert emails to Premium AdjunctWorld Members.  Click here for a description of all of the Premium Membership benefits and how to subscribe.

Thanks for being a part of the AdjunctWorld Community!

Posted by & filed under AdjunctWorld Resources.

joanna-kosinska-B6yDtYs2IgY-unsplashMost of us remember March, 2020 as being the month where—as far as education goes—pretty much most brick-and-mortar classrooms were empty. Classes, as we knew them, transitioned nearly entirely online. How did history classes fare? Here’s what the American Historical Association said in their news magazine: “History classes, in particular, are generally more adaptable to an online format than many other courses, precisely because the skills we value involve words and critical reflection—the ability to read closely, identify and weigh evidence, engage in informed debate and discussion, and write analytically and persuasively. These are qualities that are readily transferrable to the digital realm.”

To put it simply, it’s easy to post readings online and have discussions around those readings, also online. Students write and those writings get uploaded into a learning management system for the teacher’s perusal. It so happens that teaching college history courses as an online adjunct is a job very much in demand. Like any other course, it has its challenges to master, but history is a class that readily adapts to the online environment.

So how can you become an online adjunct history professor? Where are the available jobs? And what can you expect to do as an online history teacher? Read on to learn more.

Can You Teach History Online?

College history is one of the main courses you can teach online. As the American Historical Association suggested, history is suited for online learning.

The AHA points out three areas of learning: reading, discussion, and writing. The online, asynchronous format can allow for all of these—in many ways, at the students’ convenience, and certainly at the instructor’s convenience, as well.

british-library-Gw_UOoFk4Wk-unsplash (1)Readings, for example, are easily posted online through a learning management system, an LMS, and students can quickly download them and read them in their given time. Discussions in online classes are easily held on discussion boards, where students can respond to questions and hold debates, while the teachers themselves can respond as needed. Writing, as well, is easily posted to an LMS, making it easy for the instructor to download, evaluate, and upload thoughtful comments.

The nature of the history class, therefore, absent of things like “labs” where a student really would have to be present, makes it easily translatable to the online environment. If you teach history—or want to—then the online forum will allow you a lot of latitude, notably minus the commuting and the need to be in certain classrooms at certain hours on certain days. Your schedule (and the students’) is entirely up to you, at least within the parameters of the semester.

One of the benefits that accrued during the mass of online classes due to the pandemic was that new resources and tactics were drawn up by professionals like yourself and shared. The University of Washington, for example, posted a page of resources and best practices that is still available (as of this writing). A professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education likewise posted some thoughts and ideas.

What Do You Need to Be an Online History Professor?

So you’re thinking, this sounds good. What do you need to begin?

  1. First, you’ll need the right college degree. As far as the degree requirement goes, the baseline will generally be a master’s degree in history. In some cases, that master’s degree—in your discipline, of course—will need to be accompanied by graduate credit hours in the teaching discipline; eighteen hours is a general number. Conversely, you could hold a master’s degree in the teaching of history. You could also have a master’s related to history, so long as you have eighteen graduate hours in the discipline itself.
  1. Many colleges, particularly large schools, will look for experience in an academic environment—that is, they want to know you’ve actually worked in a college before. However, that does not mean you need to have worked as a “professor” before, or even an instructor. It could mean having been a graduate assistant, or even a tutor at a college. Don’t underestimate such experience! Anywhere you have worked as a student or with a professor is game for your application.
  1. In the case of online teaching, you will benefit from having online teaching experience. Not every school will require it—and some may even offer training in online teaching, sometimes required or sometimes not—but if they do, again, this need not have been in a college. You could have taught an online course for middle school, or of your own devising. Be creative with your experience; many things count as good work experience, and a college in need may readily accept the experience you have to offer.

I should mention here that, depending on the job the college is offering, you may need a Ph.D. to teach. Graduate schools needing adjuncts will require this. But there are frequently jobs at both the undergraduate and graduate level, so you needn’t be limited.

How Do You Become an Online History Professor?

The question here is, now that I know I want to teach history as an online adjunct, what do I actually need to do? First, you’ll need the right materials. All of these materials, now that we’re firmly in the 21st century, can easily be done online, uploaded to a college’s job site.

  1. As I said above, you’ll need your graduate degree, but you’ll also need your college transcripts; definitely transcripts of your postgraduate work, although have our undergraduate transcripts handy as well.
  1. You will likely need a letter of application—a cover letter, basically. In that letter, which should not go over a page, you’ll have to cover some ground: what is your academic experience as a teacher, especially online? Have you used an LMS, and if so, which one? You can offer, too, a brief but concise teaching philosophy (and in some cases, a college may ask for a separate document containing your teaching philosophy).
  1. You will need your curriculum vita—aka your vita, or just plain CV. Detail your education, where you graduated from and when. List your job experience, including any online teaching experience, or else traditional teaching. Have you had publications, grants, research? They are not required of adjuncts for the most part, but you can add them—showing your enthusiasm in the discipline can only help.
  1. Some colleges will ask only for references with contact information, and others will ask for three current letters of recommendation. Always have those ready.

Note, too, that some colleges maintain a “pool” of applicants, from which they draw according to need (which is to say, they may not always have enough classes to teach). Others will hire for a specific position altogether. Their websites will make this clear.

A quick look at a college—Kentucky State University, a Historically Black College and University, hiring for adjuncts in history—shows exactly what they are asking for of applicants. The minimum qualification is a master’s degree, with eighteen hours in a history content area, where a specialization in African-American History is preferred. Applicants must submit a letter of application, including graduate transcripts, a CV, and three letters of recommendation.

Adjunct History Professor Jobs are Online

A general search for online history teaching jobs quickly turns up a number of postings. Indian River State College in Florida set up a post that is helpful in that it details expectations, responsibilities, and more.

IRSC’s requirement to teach is a master’s degree, though they prefer a doctorate. They want to know not only that you have teaching skills (and they prefer two to five years, but it is not a requirement per se) but that you appreciate cultural diversity—Florida is very diverse in population, as you might imagine. Experience with computers and technology across the board is needed. They want you to meet the credentialing requirements for the Southern Association for Colleges and Schools.

cristina-gottardi-GeKoZualPmA-unsplashAside from general teaching expectations—grading papers, assigning grades, and so on—you must maintain posted office hours and participate in department and adjunct meetings.

Trine University in Indiana has a posting for teaching social sciences, history, political science and government—all online. They have “minimum technology requirements” and expect enthusiasm to be conveyed to students. As if you wouldn’t! But it’s good to know they value that.

Rock Valley College in Illinois has their own LMS, called EAGLE, and expect as a minimum only a master’s degree in history—and because this is the bare minimum, a college like this may be a good place to start. You can begin building teaching experience, if you’ve never taught before, that you can carry on to other schools.

It’s clear that history classes are made for online delivery. The future promises that all online programs will grow, and history is no exception. The move to online college coursework is historic—if you’ll forgive the pun. Well, and if you can forgive another pun, by taking on courses as an online adjunct history instructor, you can essentially be a part of that history. You might even make history—isn’t that what teachers do, daily?

AdjunctWorld adds online teaching jobs to its database every day, and this is an excellent resource for finding the perfect teaching position in history. Now is as good a time as ever to begin a career as an online adjunct in history—the discipline has found itself a comfortable niche online, and it looks as though it’s there to stay.

Posted by & filed under AdjunctWorld Resources.

priscilla-du-preez-F9DFuJoS9EU-unsplashIt may seem counterintuitive, but teaching psychology online is a rapidly growing field. You’d think that psychology constitutes teaching some pretty extensive information, including interpersonal soft skills —and it does—but this in no way limits it from being taught as an online course. In fact, teaching psychology online may even be ideal. No wonder so many colleges are doing it!

You can begin a career as an online adjunct psychology teacher because colleges routinely hire for such classes given the demand—psychology is in the top ten most popular college majors in this country. Like any other job teaching college courses as an adjunct, there will be certain requirements you will need to attend to: these include your college degrees, expertise in the field, and in some cases, your teaching experience.

Even those requirements are a generalization. It seems that there are plenty of jobs, and you can likely secure one without having an enormous amount of experience.

Wait, Can Psychology Actually Be Taught Online?

If you’ve ever taken a psychology course in a physical classroom, especially as an undergraduate, you might have noticed that such classes can be quite large. Introductory courses at big institutions, especially, can have more than a hundred students in a session! Such courses may rely very much on lectures, and so it’s easy to imagine transitioning such a course to an online environment.

How do you go about teaching psychology online? There are resources available online.

Walden University, which frequently hires for online adjuncts to teach psychology (they offer a Post-Master’s Online Teaching in Psychology Certificate), offers some tips. Use content that would engage and educate a student who is logging in using a learning management system (LMS), including readings, videos, and audio files. Communicate what your expectations will be in the online environment you’ve created. Be available to students, especially through the learning management system (the LMS) and by email. Finally, evaluate your performance—“nothing beats introspection,” the authors write.

chris-montgomery-smgTvepind4-unsplash (1)The Society for the Teaching of Psychology (a member of the American Psychological Association) offers a webpage teeming with peer-reviewed ideas. The APA themselves offers a page that includes resources for teaching undergraduate, graduate, and even post-graduate students. The Association for Psychological Science makes resources available, as does the Social Psychology Network on a page maintained by a professor from Wesleyan University. And there are even more resources than these, so keep looking! (And you can join a group like the APA and learn even more from colleagues.)

Given the parameters of an online class—posted readings, a discussion board to pose questions and consider answers, or teleconferencing a lecture—the online environment can be a comfortable experience for both teacher and student. There are many ways to serve up information, and many psychology courses will be just that—a lot of information rather than labs or other activities.

How Much Do Online Psychology Professors Make?

Now that we’ve addressed the question of whether teaching psychology online is a possibility, one of the next obvious questions you probably have is, how much can I make? As with all adjunct positions, the wage varies.

If you just go by search engines in your quest to find salaries for teaching psychology as an online adjunct, you’ll probably find a variety of answers. Glassdoor, for one, reports that the national average salary for an adjunct instructor of psychology is $74,985—this number was based on over 5,100 salaries submitted anonymously.

Zippia, on the other hand, writes that an adjunct psychology professor makes $49,160 a year, or an average of $23.63 an hour. Some colleges will say upfront what they offer, and it’s only a matter of visiting their human resources page or reaching out to the HR department of the college.

In either case, contacting the college themselves to clarify is important. We’ve also written a little bit about online adjunct salary in our article titled: How Much Money Does an Adjunct Make Teaching Online?

Are Online Psychology Professors in Demand?

Zippia’s research suggests that between 2018 and 2028, the career of teaching psychology as an adjunct will grow by 11% and create 155,000 jobs along the way in the U.S. If that’s the case, then there’s never been a better time to get a foot in the door.

eric-prouzet-B3UFXwcVbc4-unsplashThe website Recruiter offers similar numbers. Since 2004, they write, vacancies in postsecondary psychology teachers (and by now, this number will include online adjuncts, as well) have increased by nearly 25%, an average growth of about 1.5% a year. Recruiter projects that more than 50,000 new jobs will need to be filled in 2029 alone.

It’s interesting to note that they chart where the need lies. Some states—New York, Texas, and California—have far more postsecondary psychology teachers than other states, sometimes in the thousands. The states with the least resources include Wyoming, Alaska, South Dakota, Idaho, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana. Those states may be a good starting point for the job search; if they offer remote positions, all the better.

Do You Have to Be a Psychologist to Teach Psychology Online?

The minimum qualification for teaching psychology is having a degree in psychology, and a master’s is more likely to be the base. A doctorate will be even better, depending on what position the college is looking to fill. But you in no way have to be, or need to have been, a clinical psychologist, a researcher, or anything like that. Education is frequently enough. (However, in the case of teaching something like statistics or research methods, you will need that experience; Indiana Wesleyan University asks that applicants have “involvement in quantitative research and statistical analysis.”).

Is it helpful to be a clinical psychologist? Do some schools require it? Yes and yes. But not being a clinical psychologist isn’t a deal breaker if you are interested in pursuing a career teaching psychology online.

By analyzing over 1,000 resumes, Zippia found that 43% of adjunct psychology professors have a bachelor’s degree, and that just over 40% have a master’s. Those with doctoral degrees stand at almost 13%. Some initial career experience you can draw on outside of your degrees includes internships and being a research assistant.

So as far as those degrees go, what do you want your degrees in? Basic psychology, clinical psychology, even school counseling can all work for you. All of these need to be taught.

That said, if you do have experience in the field, then you can emphasize this in your curriculum vitae and your cover letter. It couldn’t hurt, on the one hand, but on the other, it may give you a big leg up. After all, your being able to apply that field experience in the classroom—online or not—gives students an advantage.

Can I Find Online Psychology Adjunct Jobs?

A quick Google search for jobs teaching psychology as an online adjunct—a search taken right here in Louisville, Kentucky—quickly turned up jobs at major colleges and universities right here in the state.

I saw right away that two colleges in my state’s community college system were hiring for online adjuncts to be part of their faculty pool. I also saw that one of our state’s large universities  was hiring for six different graduate programs, including Counseling Psychology, Art Therapy, Clinical Mental Health Counseling, School Counseling and Educational Psychology, and more.

A smaller state university, at the time of this writing, is looking in part for online instructors to fill a number of courses, including introductory General Psychology and upper-level courses in Theories/Methods in Developmental Psychology, History & System of Psychology and/or Research Methods for Behavioral & Social Sciences.

rabie-madaci-eo6t2CSxXhc-unsplashTo the east, The University of the Cumberlands is looking for online adjuncts to teach from nine psychology course offerings—and what an interesting set of offerings! Forensic Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, Learning and Memory, all ranging from 200- to 400-level.

And these jobs are just local, with Google picking up on a regional search. At the present moment, casting the net wider, I found over 250 jobs teaching psychology as an adjunct. AdjunctWorld posts online teaching jobs daily, so that is a good place to start looking!

Credentials Needed to Teach Psychology Online

Like any other area of teaching, requirements will vary according to the college you apply to. But here are some basics you can expect.

  1. For many of these jobs, you can expect to be asked for a higher-level degree. A doctorate will guarantee you get your CV looked at; however, a master’s may also suffice, given you have enough credit hours (say, eighteen) in the teaching discipline. That master’s will likely be a minimal. In either case, be prepared to send your college transcripts.
  2. Whether you have online teaching experience matters. In the case of Bluegrass Community and Technical College, however, preference is given to those who have taught an online course before, but it’s clearly not required. They indicate that they use Blackboard as their LMS, so knowledge with that system will help.
  3. In some cases, you may need to upload your college transcripts, as well as a current vita or resume. Three current letters of recommendation should always be on hand; some colleges may not ask for them, but some—like I found Kentucky State University does—will.
  4. Some colleges, like Cincinnati State University, might ask for “industry experience,” which could well mean working at a practice, for schools, or in a state agency.
  5. Your subject matter expertise is always valuable. Think about your expertise as you craft your CV and cover letter.

In brief, psychology is a popular college program—after all, you went through a psychology program yourself, and can attest to that. You’re part of a pool of psychology graduates, many of whom are working clinically. Not all of them will look to teach, but for those who do—like you—there are more and more psychology students at every level, undergrad through post-grad. Colleges need your help.

Teaching psychology online is a job that’s not reserved for academics. If you have been working for a private practice, or for a school, or for the state, you have the experience to teach because you have real-world experience. And that experience can be applied online, several states away. As these programs grow and multiply, the need for teachers will grow—remember, not every psychology graduate is an academic; that is, they didn’t all go into teaching! If you’ve never taught before, or have only taught a course or two, you are not at a disadvantage.

I’ve seen some suggestion that there are not enough people to teach psychology courses, and with the increase in students—and the proliferation of online courses—working toward teaching these courses seems like a smart move. There are jobs across the country, and those jobs promise to grow.